Business Highlights

Published on NewsOK Modified: August 25, 2014 at 4:58 pm •  Published: August 25, 2014
Advertisement
;

___

Mimicking the airlines, hotels get fee-happy

NEW YORK (AP) — May travelers are seeing a quickly growing list of hotel surcharges, even for items they never use.

Guaranteeing two queen beds or one king bed will cost you, as will checking in early or checking out late. Don't need the in-room safe? You're likely still paying. And the overpriced can of soda may be the least of your issues with the hotel minibar.

Vacationers are finding it harder to anticipate the true cost of their stay, especially because many of these charges vary from hotel to hotel, even within the same chain.

___

Hard to swallow? Burger King may move to Canada

NEW YORK (AP) — Some Burger King customers are finding it hard to swallow that the home of the Whopper could move to Canada.

Investors seemed to welcome the announcement by Burger King late Sunday that it was in talks to buy Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain Tim Hortons and create the world's third-largest fast-food restaurant company.

But customers were already voicing their discontent with the 60-year-old hamburger chain because of its plans to relocate its corporate headquarters from Miami to Canada in a deal that could lower its taxes.

___

Businesses: Quake cleanup shouldn't deter tourists

NAPA, Calif. (AP) — Businesses in California's wine capital are mopping up thousands of dollars in high-end vintages and sweeping glass from ghostly downtown streets that officials hope will soon bustle again with tourists following the San Francisco Bay Area's strongest earthquake in 25 years.

With the dust still settling from Sunday's magnitude-6.0 quake that struck Napa County, local officials estimated Monday that Napa Valley suffered $1 billion in property damage, including the wineries where the quake smashed bottles and overturned wine barrels.

Napa County Supervisor Bill Dodd says that since 80 percent of the region's 500 wineries were unaffected, the long-term economic impact to businesses should be modest.

___

Whisky's worries mirror economic fears in Scotland

ISLAY, Scotland (AP) — It's said that Scotch tastes of the place where it is made, so Reavey's Bruichladdich Black Art single malt would offer a touch of barley, a splash of the sea, and a whiff of salt from the island of Islay, 140 miles west of Glasgow.

That taste takes time — a long time — to produce, with top-rated Scotch aged for decades. And it means distilleries need to have long-term plans for investments and financing — all of which could be thrown into turmoil in a single day, Sept. 18, when Scotland votes on whether to leave Britain.

Whisky makers and other businesses are worried about the risks involved in finding themselves in a new country with, among other things, a different currency.

___

Legal questions arise for fantasy day game biz

Some of the newest incarnations of fantasy football look a lot more like gambling than intricate, outsmart-your-opponent strategy games.

Since 2011, the billion-dollar fantasy market has been infused with dozens of daily and weekly games. Those games allow players to win huge prizes quickly, sometimes in one week, sometimes in just one night. With players betting thousands or even tens of thousands a night, legal experts believe it's time to review the section of the 2006 federal law that was written specifically to protect fantasy sports from being banned the way online poker was.

___

Amazon to buy video game streaming platform Twitch

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is buying video game streaming platform Twitch Interactive for $970 million in cash as it seeks to expand its presence in gaming.

As video gaming grows into an online spectator sport, gameplay video feeds are becoming increasingly lucrative. Twitch had 55 million unique visitors in July, most of whom went to the Twitch.tv website to watch other people play games —competitions interspersed with advertising.

Continue reading this story on the...