Alaska gov.'s plan would change cruise waste rules

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 24, 2013 at 8:05 am •  Published: January 24, 2013
Advertisement
;

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Gov. Sean Parnell is proposing changes to the way the state regulates wastewater from cruise ships — drawing criticism that his proposal would roll back provisions of a 2006 citizen initiative that required cruise ships to meet state water quality standards when dumping wastewater.

The proposal, SB29 in the state Senate, got its first hearing Wednesday in front of the chamber's Resources Committee. Larry Hartig, commissioner of the state Department of Environmental Conservation, said the proposal would align the rules for cruise ships with those for others who get discharge permits from the agency.

According to a sectional analysis, the measure would require that cruise ships discharge wastewater in a manner consistent with applicable state or federal law. It would strike the more stringent requirement that discharges meet state water quality standards at the point of discharge.

It also would allow authorization of mixing zones if ships meet certain standards for treatment of discharge. The system used either would have to be an advanced treatment system or the ship would have to use methods that achieve the quality of effluent comparable to one or more ships using an advanced system.

Hartig said the department can set restrictions for mixing zones and decide where, when and how ships can discharge to protect for other uses.

Lawmakers in 2009 passed legislation allowing the department to temporarily let cruise ships have mixing zones; at that time, cruise ship companies weren't meeting the more rigorous standard set out by the initiative, at least for certain pollutants, Hartig said in a letter to lawmakers earlier this month. That authority is set to expire in 2015.

The legislation also called for a science advisory panel that was tasked with looking at pollution and pollution control issues. That panel concluded that advance wastewater treatment systems required in 2004 were "state of the art," Hartig said, and it could not identify other systems that exist or were on the horizon that would bring ships fully into compliance.

The panel, in a preliminary report from November, found that none of the advanced wastewater treatment systems on ships operating in Alaska waters could consistently meet water quality standards at the point of discharge for "constituents of concern" — ammonia, copper, nickel and zinc.

Parnell, in his transmittal letter, said the advanced systems being used "are significantly more effective and produce a higher quality discharge than most municipal systems."

Continue reading this story on the...