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US sen. from Pa.: Expand Social Security screening

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 27, 2013 at 8:45 pm •  Published: January 27, 2013
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PHILADELPHIA (AP) — U.S. Sen. Bob Casey says a pilot program designed to prevent criminals from becoming managers of a person's Social Security benefits has screened out dozens of people convicted of fraud and violence.

The Pennsylvania Democrat now wants the Social Security Administration to expand and improve the initiative, which was launched last summer in five states and Washington, D.C., after a convicted killer on parole in Philadelphia allegedly kept several mentally disabled people captive while cashing their benefits checks.

In a letter to Social Security Commissioner Michael Astrue, Casey asks the federal agency to provide him with more information on goals, methods and a timeline for a revamped background check system. Casey's office provided a draft of the letter Sunday to The Associated Press.

About 5.6 million representative payees — those who receive benefits on behalf of people who cannot manage the funds themselves — handle $61 billion in Social Security payments each year for about 7.6 million beneficiaries.

"These beneficiaries need to know their representatives are individuals who can be trusted," Casey wrote.

A spokeswoman said Casey would discuss the letter further at a news conference on Monday. A Social Security spokesman could not be reached for comment.

Casey has been pushing the agency to be more vigilant in performing background checks on people who want to be designated as representative payees. He announced the pilot program in June, which includes Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Under the program, Social Security offices in the Philadelphia region instituted a new policy that barred people convicted of certain crimes — including sex offenses, theft, forgery and abuse — from serving as payees. Applicants were asked specific questions about past criminal behavior and agency employees used an in-house database to cross-check convictions.

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