NYC spared the worst as storm slams Long Island

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 9, 2013 at 10:02 pm •  Published: February 9, 2013
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NEW YORK (AP) — The massive Northeast storm that battered Long Island with 2 ½ feet of snow, knocked out power to thousands there, made roofs fall in and stranded hundreds of motorists on its highways prompted New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ask other towns and cities Saturday to send plows to help dig out the part of the state hit the hardest by far.

Drivers abandoned their vehicles on Long Island and even snowplows got stuck, leading authorities to close major highways to all but emergency vehicles. Emergency workers had to use snowmobiles to try to reach stranded motorists.

While no deaths were reported among stranded drivers, a 58-year-old man died after suffering a medical problem while clearing snow off his car at his mother's Long Island apartment complex, Suffolk County police and a witness said. The man was found near his still-running car around 5 p.m., after his mother became concerned that he had left hours before to run to the store for her and hadn't returned, said Dennis Castillo, a worker at the complex, in Selden.

In New York City, the snow accumulation in Central Park was 11.4 inches and 12.1 at LaGuardia Airport. Meteorologist David Stark said the city got more sleet rather than snow, which suppressed the snowfall totals.

By contrast, in Suffolk County on Long Island, Upton had 30.3 inches of snow, Stark said. Several other towns topped 2 feet: Setauket, Smithtown, Port Jefferson, Mount Sinai, Islip, Huntington and Commack.

Weighed down by the snow, roofs collapsed at a bowling alley and a home in Suffolk County, according to police and a news report.

No one was in AMF Smithtown Lanes when part of the bowling center's roof caved in around 4:30 p.m. Saturday, police said. At the home, in Selden, a woman ran out in her slippers to get to safety, while her husband was already outside, shoveling snow, neighbor Michael Thyfault told WCBS-TV.

Selden Fire Department officials didn't immediately return a call later Saturday, and police and a spokesman for Brookhaven Town, which includes Selden, had no immediate information. The bowling alley's managers didn't immediately return a call.

In Nassau County, Wantagh reported 11 inches.

In New York City, the mayor had prepared residents for the storm with all hands on deck: More than 2,200 vehicles plowed and salted streets overnight, clearing every major thoroughfare at least once, and even most secondary streets.

Traffic flowed easily.

"We're in great shape. We're lucky," Mayor Michael Bloomberg told plow workers at a sanitation garage in Queens. "We've dodged a bullet."

"It's not that bad," said carpenter Kevin Byrne, as he dug his car out of its Manhattan parking spot. "It's not as bad as everybody said it was going to be."

Communities in the outer boroughs still suffering from the aftermath of last October's superstorm were mostly spared this time.

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