Eating out: Obama's new overtures to GOP lawmakers

Published on NewsOK Modified: March 6, 2013 at 8:38 pm •  Published: March 6, 2013
Advertisement
;

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shifting course in the face of political gridlock, President Barack Obama is making rare overtures to rank-and-file Republicans, inviting GOP senators to dinner Wednesday, planning visits to Capitol Hill and working the phones with lawmakers.

Obama's efforts are aimed at jumpstarting budget talks and rallying support for his proposals on immigration and gun control.

The president's new charm offensive underscores the limitations of his earlier attempts to use public pressure, rather than direct engagement, to win Republican cooperation. That strategy proved futile in recent weeks, as the White House and Congress failed to prevent $85 billion in automatic budget cuts that both sides said they wanted to avoid.

As that "sequester" has started taking effect, Obama has begun quietly calling congressional Republicans to discuss the prospects for an elusive longer-term deficit reduction deal as well as his other second-term priorities. Aides say Obama is concentrating his outreach on lawmakers with a history of bipartisan deal-making and those who have indicated some willingness to support increased tax revenue as part of a big deficit-cutting package.

In both his calls and dinner invitations, the president pointedly has skipped over Sen. Mitch McConnell and House Speaker John Boehner, the GOP leaders who insist that Obama will get no further tax hikes from Capitol Hill.

Republicans have had mixed reactions to the outreach from the president, who previously has shown little appetite for personal engagement with lawmakers, often preferring to assign those efforts to his staff and Vice President Joe Biden.

"He's never spent anytime reaching out," said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who spoke with the president this week about gun legislation. "The question is, is it starting to change because there is bad poll numbers or is it because he really decided he's going to lead and solve some of the problems of the country?"

Sen. Lindsey Graham, a frequent critic of the White House on national security issues, said he was encouraged by Obama's efforts.

"This is how you solve hard problems," the South Carolina Republican said.

It was during a phone call with Graham this week that the president raised the prospect of a group dinner with Republican lawmakers, an Obama aide said. Graham agreed to put together a guest list.

Along with Graham and Coburn, the lawmakers at Wednesday's dinner were Sens. John McCain, Kelly Ayotte, Pat Toomey, Bob Corker, Ron Johnson, Saxby Chambliss, John Hoeven, Dan Coats, Richard Burr and Mike Johanns. The two-hour dinner took place on neutral territory - the Jefferson Hotel, a few blocks from the White House.

A White House official said Obama had a good exchange of ideas with the lawmakers, but offered no specifics on what was discussed. The president picked up the tab for dinner, the White House said.

McCain, responding to a reporter's question about how the dinner went, jokingly said "terrible," then added that the meal went "just fine."

Obama has often scoffed at the notion that calling or meeting with Republicans more frequently would soften the ground for substantive negotiations on fiscal issues and other matters.

"I think a lot of folks say, 'Well, if we look like we're being too cooperative or too chummy with the president that might cause us problems,'" Obama said, referring to the Republicans, in January. "'That might be an excuse for us to get a challenge from somebody in a primary.'"

Continue reading this story on the...