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Published on NewsOK Modified: October 9, 2015 at 4:55 pm •  Published: October 9, 2015


Research beefing up steaks, hamburgers with healthy omega-3s

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Health-conscious consumers might be persuaded to eat more beef if it was fortified with heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids naturally found in salmon and walnuts, according to researchers and some ranchers who are feeding cattle flaxseed — even marine algae — with an eye to offering another wholesome dinner choice.

People have long been told they can decrease their risk of heart disease by eating more omega-3 fatty acids, the kind salmon get from algae. It inspired researchers at Kansas State University: Could the steaks and hamburgers from cattle fattened on algae pass on those healthy fats?


Steve Jobs plays dual role of hero, villain in the movies

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple co-founder Steve Jobs became renowned for conjuring a "reality distortion field" that made people believe whatever he wanted.

If he were still around, it's easy to imagine that Jobs would be summoning all his powers of persuasion to protect a legacy that's getting muddied with each cinematic take on his fascinating life.

"Steve Jobs," which opened Friday, is the latest movie to examine a charismatic visionary who mesmerized the masses with his trendsetting gadgets while alienating his subordinates and friends with an almost-inhumane cruel streak.


2 Fed officials think data will justify rate hike this year

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a question whose answer seems to be in constant flux: When will the Federal Reserve finally raise interest rates?

Two voting members of the Fed's policy committee weighed in Friday with a similar view: That a rate hike remains likely by the end of 2015 but that any Fed decision will depend on how the economy fares between now and then.


VW may compensate owners of diesel cars for loss of value

DETROIT (AP) — Volkswagen could compensate owners of diesel-powered cars that emit high levels of pollutants, possibly by paying them for the lost value of their vehicles, the company's top U.S. executive said.

Speaking to lawmakers investigating the emissions cheating, U.S. CEO Michael Horn also said fixing most of the 500,000 affected cars in the U.S. could take one to two years, possibly more. The fix, he said, would not hurt fuel mileage, but it could hinder the cars' performance, knocking one or two miles-per-hour off the top speed.


US wholesale stockpiles rise in August, but sales fall

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cheaper oil and less demand for autos and machinery weighed on wholesalers in August, as their inventories edged up just slightly while sales dropped.

The Commerce Department said Friday that wholesale stockpiles rose 0.1 percent, and sales fell 1 percent. Sales have slid 4.7 percent over the past 12 months. Inventories have increased 4.1 percent.

Falling oil prices account for much of the declining sales.

Oil inventories — which are measured in dollars — plummeted 4.6 percent in August and 36.6 percent over the past 12 months. Sales of autos and machinery also slipped. But rising inventories for equipment, pharmaceuticals and chemicals suggest that wholesalers still see ongoing demand heading into end of the year.


Finance officials to clamp down on multinational tax evasion

LIMA, Peru (AP) — Finance officials from the world's 20 biggest economies have committed to toughening laws and boosting cross-border cooperation to prevent multinational companies from avoiding as much as $250 billion a year in taxes.

The unanimous agreement was announced Friday in Peru's capital on the sidelines of the International Monetary Fund's annual meeting. The plan, to be presented to heads of state for approval next month at a Group of 20 summit in Turkey, seeks to address concerns about whether large companies such as Apple and Google are paying their fair amount of taxes.


Gene editing: Research spurs debate over promise vs. ethics

WASHINGTON (AP) — The hottest tool in biology has scientists using words like revolutionary as they describe the long-term potential: wiping out certain mosquitoes that carry malaria, treating genetic diseases like sickle-cell, preventing babies from inheriting a life-threatening disorder.

It may sound sci-fi, but research into genome editing is booming. So is a debate about its boundaries, what's safe and what's ethical to try in the quest to fight disease.


UAW leaders approve richer Fiat Chrysler contract

DETROIT (AP) — The United Auto Workers union unveiled a richer proposed contract with Fiat Chrysler on Friday, a week after angry union members voted down a previous agreement.

The new agreement would gradually eliminate a much-maligned tiered pay system and bring all U.S. factory workers to the same wage over eight years. The previous agreement had only promised a top wage of $25 per hour for lower-tiered workers, which is less than the $29 per hour that longtime workers would make.


Petition drive assures House vote to revive Ex-Im Bank

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several dozen Republicans teamed up with Democrats Friday to assure a House vote on reviving the U.S. Export-Import Bank, giving the effort to save the bank new life more than three months after its charter lapsed.

The development came as bank supporters got a majority of the House to sign a petition to dislodge a measure to revive it from a powerful panel controlled by a bank opponent. The bank helps finance sales of U.S. exports to foreign customers.


House OKs lifting 40-year-old US ban on oil exports

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defying a White House veto threat, the Republican-controlled House on Friday approved a bill to lift a 40-year-old U.S. ban on crude oil exports. Supporters argued that an ongoing boom in oil and gas drilling has made the 1970s-era restrictions obsolete.

The bill was approved, 261-159, with 26 Democrats joining Republicans in backing the measure that now heads to the Senate, where prospects are uncertain.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said lifting the export ban would lower prices at the pump, create jobs and boost the economy.


Wal-Mart names executive with international wing as next CFO

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart named Brett Biggs, an executive in its international division, as its next chief financial officer Friday.

Biggs will take over on Dec. 31, though Charles Holley, 59, who is retiring, will remain with Wal-Mart for a month to help with the transition.

Biggs, 47, has been CFO and executive vice president of Wal-Mart's international business since 2014. He has played a number of roles at Wal-Mart since joining the company in 2000.

Holley has been CFO for nearly five years and has been with the company for more than two decades.


SABMiller meets with investors amid takeover bid

LONDON (AP) — SABMiller met with investors Friday to underscore its strength as an independent company, as the world's second-biggest brewer seeks to head off a takeover by larger rival Anheuser-Busch InBev.

SABMiller said the meetings focused on the company's accelerating growth and a stepped up cost-cutting program that will target $1.05 billion of savings by March 2020, more than double the previous goal of $500 million by 2018.


Glencore shares storm ahead on zinc cutback news

LONDON (AP) — Shares in commodities group Glencore rose strongly Friday after the company said it is slashing its zinc production by a third and cutting jobs in response to a sharp fall in the price of the metal.

The move — which will involve a cut in annual zinc production by 500,000 tons in Australia, South America and Kazakhstan — is the latest response by the Switzerland-based company to the slide in commodity prices that has raised concerns over Glencore's underlying business model.

Investors responded positively and Glencore shares closed up 7 percent in London at 129 pence.


US boosts privacy protection on health insurance website

WASHINGTON (AP) — Responding to criticism from civil liberties advocates, the Obama administration said Friday it has strengthened consumer privacy protections on the government's health insurance website as a new sign-up season nears. CEO Kevin Counihan said in a blog post that the web page will have a new 'privacy manager' that lets consumers opt out of embedded connections to third-party advertising, analytics and social media sites.

In addition, if a consumer has enabled the "Do Not Track" setting on their browser, the government will automatically honor their preferences as relates to receiving digital advertising from


By The Associated Press=

The Dow Jones industrial average picked up 33.74 points, or 0.2 percent, to close at 17,084.49. The Standard & Poor's 500 index added 1.46 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,014.89. The Nasdaq composite rose 19.68 points, or 0.4 percent, to 4,830.47.

Benchmark crude oil rose 20 cents to close at $49.63 a barrel in New York. Brent Crude, which is used to price international oils, slipped 40 cents to $52.65 a barrel in London. Wholesale gasoline rose 0.9 cents to close at $1.417 a gallon. Heating oil fell 1.1 cents to close at $1.591 a gallon. Natural gas rose 0.4 cents to close at $2.502 per 1,000 cubic feet.


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