Familiar foes Ottawa, Pittsburgh offer contrasts

Published on NewsOK Modified: May 13, 2013 at 5:18 pm •  Published: May 13, 2013

PITTSBURGH (AP) — The celebration, at least by the typically all-business standards of the Pittsburgh Penguins, appeared a little over the top.

The second Brooks Orpik's slapshot ripped into the back of the net 7:49 into overtime last Saturday to give the Penguins a 4-3 overtime win and a first-round playoff series victory over the better-than-advertised New York Islanders, Orpik's teammates spilled over the boards and sprinted toward the veteran defenseman like kids running after the bell rings on the final day of school.

For a team used to success this time of year, it appeared a little out of character.

Then again, it's been awhile. The first goal in Orpik's 78 career playoff games propelled the Penguins into the second round starting Tuesday against Ottawa while easing some of the pain of early postseason exits in 2011 and 2012.

"I know a lot of people are making a big deal out of that, trying to connect it to the last couple years," Orpik said. "I don't know, maybe it was built up in some people."

Just not, Orpik insists, the guys in the Pittsburgh dressing room.

"Half the guys in this room weren't here the last couple years," he said. "This group that's right here is 1-0 in the playoffs as far as I see it. Hopefully our confidence is just building off the first round."

The Penguins should feel confident — and a bit fortunate — to escape the relentless Islanders. New York dominated for long stretches in the series, using its speed to fluster Pittsburgh's talented but sometimes plodding roster of veterans. Though the Penguins never trailed, they were seemingly never really in control over the final five games.

They advanced anyway after a well-timed goaltender switch from struggling Marc-Andre Fleury to backup Tomas Vokoun, who fought off the pesky Islanders in Games 5 and 6.

Now Vokoun or Fleury — coach Dan Bylsma isn't saying who will start Game 1 — will face an entirely different product in the Senators, owners one of the NHL's stingiest defenses with one major axe to grind.

Pittsburgh knocked Ottawa out of the playoffs fairly easily in 2008 and 2010, though both clubs believe it is ancient history.

"I think any playoff matchup, I would consider a rivalry," Pittsburgh captain Sidney Crosby said. "That's kind of typical in the playoffs for anything; it kind of develops as the playoffs go on. With the history with them I'm sure there's a little extra there but I think at this point you want every game just as much as you would against any, I guess, 'rival' you could say."

More pressing is a simmering feud between the Senators and Penguins winger/part-time instigator Matt Cooke.

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