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At Remington Park, the race doesn't begin until Ed Crane says so

Ed Crane, 66, was the starter when the racetrack opened on Sept. 1, 1988, and he will be the starter Monday when the Oklahoma City track officially celebrates its 25th anniversary.
by Ed Godfrey Modified: September 2, 2013 at 10:00 am •  Published: September 1, 2013

Ed Crane has sounded the bell for all but a handful of races at Remington Park, more than 30,000.

Crane, 66, was the starter when the racetrack opened on Sept. 1, 1988, and he will be the starter Monday when the Oklahoma City track officially celebrates its 25th anniversary.

As the starter, Crane stands near the rail and watches the gate from several feet away. It's his call when to push the button to start the race.

When he does, the gates flash open, the bell rings, and the horses race down the track.

Sounds like an easy job, but it is Crane and the gate crew's responsibility to ensure a fair and safe start for all.

Crane intently watches as the horses walk in, waiting for the moment when the entire field is still and calm. The decision to push the button is based on instinct and experience.

He doesn't want to wait long. He starts the race at the first opportunity the entire field appears ready. The longer the horses are at the gate, the greater the chance that something will go wrong.

“It doesn't always turn into a good start,” Crane said. “Sometimes you have to take a start when everything is going to turn south on you.”

The most important work done by Crane and the gate crew is not done at the race, but in early morning training sessions with young quarter horses and thoroughbreds, trying to acclimate them to surroundings around a starting gate.

“The horses have to know when they come here (to race), they have to do what they are supposed to do,” Crane said. “They have to walk in the gate and stand there and look down the racetrack and leave when it comes time.”

The work done in advance helps things go more smoothly on race day. Most of the time. At times, even a schooled horse doesn't cooperate.

“I had one the other night refuse,” Crane said. “We pushed the button and he just stood there.”

Loading a 1,400-pound horse into a racing gate can be difficult. Sometimes, they will rear up. Sometimes they will sit down. Occasionally, they will even get underneath the gate.

“You will be surprised the position that they can get themselves in,” Crane said. “I've seen horses flip all the way out of the gate and not touch anything. Not many. I think three since I've been here.”

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by Ed Godfrey
Copy Editor, Outdoors Editor, Rodeo, River Sports Reporter
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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