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AT&T used automated system to check employees' safety following storms

AT&T Oklahoma President Bryan Gonterman explains how AT&T's Yes Okay system helps the company locate its employees following disasters like last month's tornadoes.
Oklahoman Published: June 26, 2013

Q&A with Bryan Gonterman

AT&T finding new ways to check on employees after disaster

Q: Several years ago, AT&T set up Yes Okay disaster communications structure to account for the safety its employees after a disaster. Why is that important?

A: Our top priority is to account for each and every employee as quickly as possible, which allows us to more quickly focus our efforts on responding to our customers' needs.

Q: How does the Yes Okay system work?

A: It's designed to automatically contact employees by text and email in locations that have been struck by a disaster. Employees respond to those messages with their user ID — a unique code that each employee uses for internal identification — to confirm the message was received and that they are unharmed. The system automatically compiles reports for supervisors, providing emergency contact information to help them account for impacted personnel and allowing them to focus on identifying and locating employees who haven't yet reported their status.

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by Paula Burkes
A 1981 journalism graduate of Oklahoma State University, Paula Burkes has more than 30 years experience writing and editing award-winning material for newspapers and healthcare, educational and telecommunications institutions in Tulsa, Oklahoma...
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