Authorities search for bridge collapse impostor

By Clayton Bellamy Published: June 7, 2002
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TULSA - The man who called himself Capt. William Clark wore a green beret, camouflage fatigues and shiny boots. And he didn't hesitate to give orders after the deadly interstate bridge collapse.

But even as emergency workers followed his orders, they began to suspect something was not quite right about Clark, who claimed to be with U.S. Army Special Forces.

Maybe it was his paunchy stomach, or how he hot-rodded an all-terrain vehicle, kicking up rocks on the riverfront near a boat ramp used to launch rescue missions.

Indeed, authorities Friday continued searching for Billy Clark, an ex-convict from Tallapoosa, Mo. They say he impersonated an army officer to take command of the launch site for nearly two days after 14 people were killed when an Interstate 40 bridge fell in eastern Oklahoma.

Clark is just the latest in a string of alleged impostors who have bluffed their way into restricted areas after national disasters.

Jerome Brandl, who posed as a volunteer firefighter to gain access to the collapsed World Trade Center, was sentenced in March to one to three years in prison.

David Williams of Bay Shore, N.Y., entered the TWA Flight 800 crash site claiming to be an Army Reserve colonel. He was sentenced separately in 1996 to six months in jail for impersonating a doctor.

Catherine Felicitas, who pretended to be a doctor to meet relatives of victims of TWA Flight 800, was also removed from restricted areas after the crash of Swissair Flight 111 in New York in 1998.

Relatives and investigators say Clark, 36, has a history of assuming false identities to gain free meals, free rooms or merchandise.

"It's just a big ego trip," said Lt. Brent Grill, lead police investigator in Van Buren, Ark, where Clark is accused of renting rooms and not paying. "It's a fantasy of his, which becomes a reality when he gets to play the part."

Clark arrived in Webbers Falls just two hours after the May 26 bridge collapse and told Mayor Jewell Horne that he was in charge. He even gave media interviews.

What made him more convincing was that he already knew about one of the victims - Army Capt. Andrew Clements - before any bodies had been pulled from the river, Horne said.

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