Bakken oil not more risky than others, industry says

The U.S. oil industry asserted Tuesday that oil from the Northern Plains is no more dangerous than some other cargoes of crude.
By JAMES MacPHERSON and MATTHEW BROWN, Associated Press Published: May 21, 2014
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— The U.S. oil industry pushed back Tuesday against tougher rules for rail cars carrying crude following a string of fiery accidents, asserting in a new report that oil from the northern Plains is no more dangerous than some other cargoes.

But the results of the industry-funded study differ from the stance of the federal government, which issued a safety alert in January warning the public, emergency responders and shippers about the potential high volatility of crude from the Bakken oil patch.

The oil from North Dakota and Montana is comparable to other light crudes, with characteristics that fall well within the margin of safety for the current tank car fleet, the industry study says.

Kari Cutting, vice president of the North Dakota Petroleum Council, said it proves federal rules “are sufficient.”

But a former senior federal railway safety official disagreed and said recent accidents are enough to justify government intervention.

“We already have examples of this particular crude going ‘boom,’” said Grady Cothen, former deputy associate administrator for safety at the Federal Railroad Administration. “That’s how it has to be treated from a regulatory standpoint despite the distinctions being made” by oil companies.

Oil trains in the U.S. and Canada were involved in at least eight major accidents during the last year, including an explosion of Bakken crude in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, that killed 47 people. Other trains carrying Bakken crude have since derailed and caught fire in Alabama, North Dakota, Virginia and New Brunswick.

Old tank cars blamed

Regulators in response have discouraged shippers from using older tank cars known to rupture during accidents.

The U.S. Department of Transportation issued the January safety alert about Bakken crude, which is produced from a huge oil shale reserve that has propelled North Dakota to the nation’s second-largest oil producer behind Texas.

The North Dakota Petroleum Council, which represents more than 500 companies working in the oil fields of North Dakota and Montana, commissioned the $400,000 study of Bakken crude characteristics. The group said more than 150 oil samples were taken from well sites and rail facilities throughout North Dakota and Montana, and sent to independent laboratories for analyses. Results will be shared with federal regulators this month, the group said.

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