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McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Food Budget for Monday, February 17, 2014

Updated at 8:00 a.m. EST (1300 UTC).

This budget is now available on the Web at http://www.mctdirect.com, with direct links to stories and art. See details at the end of the budget.

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 17, 2014 at 6:27 am •  Published: February 17, 2014
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(MCT)

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Food Budget for Monday, February 17, 2014

Updated at 8:00 a.m. EST (1300 UTC).

This budget is now available on the Web at http://www.mctdirect.com, with direct links to stories and art. See details at the end of the budget.

^TOP STORIES<

^Warm up your kitchen, mornings with coffeecakes<

^COFFEE-CAKE:PG_

I like working with yeast doughs to make breads and coffeecakes, and no, they aren't hard at all. They do take time, start to finish, but most of that time is unattended.

Over the years, I've made dozens of sweet-roll dough recipes, all variations on a theme. I finally settled on one favorite recipe. My go-to dough makes three coffeecakes and requires no kneading. None. A hand-held electric mixer does the work. After the first rise, I shape the dough into twists, pan rolls, sticky buns, tea rings or monkey bread. Fillings are anything I have on hand.

2050 by Marlene Parrish. MOVED

PHOTOS

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^Hard cider mounting 'a massive comeback'<

WBS-HARD-CIDER:FT _ Cider was once America's drink, but after getting buried by beer and trampled by the temperance movement, one of the world's oldest alcoholic beverages is fermenting a rebirth.

"After more than 100 years in decline, cider is making a massive comeback," said Will McClatchey, director of research at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas in Fort Worth, who has been studying cider orchards around the world since 2005.

Now they are popping up around him in Texas.

Englishman Ed Gibson, who rolled out the first batch of hard cider two years ago from his company, Austin Eastciders, says: "The renaissance is happening right in front of us. Even the big guys like Anheuser-Busch and Stella-Artois are bringing out ciders."

1300 by Steve Campbell in Fort Worth, Texas. MOVED

PHOTOS

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^Go soft on broccoli and cauliflower: Cook them a little longer for a surprising difference in flavor<

^BROCCOLI-CAULIFLOWER:LA_

Actually, there are many members of the family that fall in between. There are even white broccolis, oddly enough. Perhaps the most recognizable example is the gorgeous romanesco broccoli, which looks like an experiment in fractal geometry that can fit on your dinner plate. Or, should I say, romanesco cauliflower because, despite the name it's commonly given, it's actually closer to that than broccoli, even if it is a pale shade of green.

Besides that tricky bit of food geekery, another thing broccoli and cauliflower share in common is how well they respond to being cooked until they are fairly soft. This will come as a shock to those who still cling to the old "tender-crisp" style of vegetable cookery. But you really should give it a try.

1750 by Russ Parsons. MOVED

PHOTOS

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^Food with a twist: Let pretzel sticks give your party a lift<

^PRETZEL-STICKS:TB_

They deserve more than a toss into the snack bowl. Make them a key player at your Super Bowl gathering: Employ them as edible pickup sticks, replacing toothpicks. Think of the time you'll save not fishing errant toothpicks out of the sofa or shag carpeting.

And think of pretzel sticks as conversation starters if the commercials are duds. Here are some ideas to get you started.

300 by Judy Hevrdejs. MOVED

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^Disappointed with homemade? Boost the flavor<

^SCRATCH-BETTER:CH_

Except . . . well, sometimes you may wonder if that's true. Convenience products have such ramped-up flavors _ so much sodium, so many flavor enhancers, so many shortcuts.

Are we the only ones who sometimes find the version we labor over seems disappointing?

"Yeah, like there's no 'there' there," agreed Lucinda Scala Quinn. "You know how depressing it is when you cook and you get to the table and it just lays there."

She's the author of two "Mad Hungry" books on feeding her three sons and the executive food director of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, for crying out loud. But even she has dishes that need help.

Most experienced cooks figure out little tricks that can boost flavor, small additions that can make a big difference.

2000 by Diedra Laird. MOVED

PHOTOS

^OTHER RECIPES, STORIES<

^Make your own doggone good treats<

^PETS-RECIPES:PG_

One in five Americans will show their four-legged best friends some love on Feb. 14, spending, according to a National Retail Federation survey, a collective $817 million on Valentine's Day goodies for their pets.

Dogs don't appreciate flowers or dinner reservations, so many of those gifts will come in the form of packaged doggie treats, either commercially prepared ones or those made in small, gourmet batches by artisan bakers, such as Sarah Lavery of The Pet Bakery of Oakmont (see accompanying story). But if you're even the tiniest bit comfortable in the kitchen, you can make some dog-gone good pet cuisine yourself at home, in some cases at a fraction of the cost with ingredients you already have in your pantry.

It's almost as easy as ripping open a bag of Snausages, and a heck of a lot healthier for your dog, whose nutritional needs are important, too. Besides, it's fun, especially if you get the kids involved.

1350 by Gretchen McKay. MOVED

PHOTOS

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^Veterinarian makes pet treats with carefully chosen ingredients<

^PETS-TREATS:PG_

For many, the answer was to take matters into their own hands.

A quick search on Amazon turns up a plethora of organic, all-natural and gourmet pet treats and dog food. But there's also dozens of specialty cookbooks for dogs, which _ despite their love of table scraps _ have nutritional needs quite different from humans.

1200 by Gretchen McKay. MOVED

PHOTOS

^NUTRITION, FOOD SAFETY<

^New food-stamp rules could be felt in Arizona convenience stores<

NTR-FOODSTAMPS-CONVENIENCE:MCT _ Convenience stores will have to start stocking a variety of "staple foods" alongside the snacks and fountain drinks if they want to keep accepting food stamps, under a little-noticed section of the federal farm bill.

The provision, tucked into the nearly 1,000-page bill signed into law Feb. 7 by President Barack Obama, would require that stores increase the "depth of stock" in four of those staples: bread or cereals, vegetables or fruits, dairy products, and meat, poultry or fish.

Convenience store chain officials said this week that they think they can meet the new standards. And nutritionists said they think it could lead to better food options for low-income shoppers.

But both said it will depend on the details of the regulations and how they are implemented.

800 (with trims) by Mauro Whiteman in Washington. MOVED

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^A heart-healthy diet can include flavorful foods<

^NTR-HEART-HEALTHY:LX_

"There is no one 'superfood' or nutrient that can prevent heart disease," said registered dietitian Kathleen Stanley, left. "Research has shown that diets that contain whole grains and fruits and vegetables, and are generally low in fats, can help reduce risk for heart disease."

According to statistics from the American Heart Association, heart disease affects more than 82 million Americans. We know the steps to take to reduce the risk: Don't smoke, lower blood pressure if it is high, eat a healthy diet (low in saturated fat, low in trans fat, low in cholesterol, low in salt), stay active, achieve and maintain a healthy weight, follow medical advice, and see your physician regularly.

1250 by Sharon Thompson. MOVED

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This nutrition feature moves regularly:

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^NTR-DIABETES-QUICKFIX:MCT_

400 by Linda Gassenheimer. MOVED

^TRENDS, NEW PRODUCTS<

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These food trend features move regularly:

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^COOKQA:CH_

200 by Kathleen Purvis. MOVED

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^TIDBITS:MS_

350 by Al Sicherman. MOVED

^WINE & BEER<

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These wine features move regularly:

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^WBS-WINE:MCT_

950 by Fred Tasker. MOVED

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^WBS-WINEWEEK:LA_

150 by S. Irene Virbila. MOVED

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^REGULAR FEATURES<

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These food features move regularly unless otherwise noted:

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^CORNER:MI_

1000 by Linda Cicero. MOVED

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^QUICKFIX:MI_

400 by Linda Gassenheimer. MOVED

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^RECIPE-FINDER:BZ_

600 by Julie Rothman. MOVED

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^SOS:LA_

350 by Noelle Carter. MOVED

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^SHELF:TB_

300 by Judy Hevrdejs. MOVED

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^NOT MOVING<

^EDGYVEGGIE:MI_

By Ellen Kanner (not moving; moves occasionally).

^FOODFAST:TB_

(Not moving; moves occasionally).

^TECHNIQUES:MI_

By Carole Kotkin (not moving; moves occasionally

^PHOTO GALLERIES NOW OFFERED<

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MCT is now offering photo galleries for use on your websites and apps available at http://www.mctdirect.com/gallery/. In our stuffed photo gallery files you will find hand-picked groups of 10-20 hi-res jpgs, complete with slideshow-ready captions. For a limited time, these galleries are being offered as part of your MCT Photo subscription or are available for download a la carte. If you have content questions or suggestions, please contact the MCT Photo Desk at (202) 383-6099 or mctphotohelp@mctinfoservices.com.

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MCT News Service is available on our Web site, MCT Direct (http://www.mctdirect.com). Subscribers can access 30 days' worth of budgets with clickable links to stories and art; stories searchable by subject and category with links to images; and an easy-to-search archive of more than 1 million items _ stories, photos, graphics, illustrations, paginated pages and caricatures.

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MCT Food Editor: Karen Denny, 202-383-6157, kdenny@mctinfo.com

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