Beaux Arts Ball king named

Civic contributions and community services led to crowning of David E. Rainbolt, chief executive of BancFirst Corporation, as king of the 67th Beaux Arts Ball benefiting the Oklahoma City Museum of Art.
BY PEGGY GANDY pgandy@opubco.com Published: December 2, 2012
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Being closely involved in the city's banking community, Rainbolt, when asked, shared some of his insights pertaining to the city's banking arena. He pointed out that the city has outperformed the rest of the country economically since the turn of the millennium. “I doubt there is much debate that Devon, Chesapeake, SandRidge and recently Continental Resources, have been the foundation of that performance. Inevitably, we will at one point — hopefully well into the future — go through a cycle where growth slows for a little while. However, that will not diminish how far we have come, nor that future generations will build again from that point.”

A past chairman of Downtown OKC, this community advocate said he continues to be amazed at how efficient the city has been in directing relatively limited resources toward projects with high impact.

“We have seen Bricktown, the Civic Center, the river complex, library, health science center, Automobile Alley, Myriad Gardens, the art museum, and of course, the Thunder and Chesapeake Arena, all come to pass in just a decade or two. This sort of metamorphosis is almost inconceivable over such a short time frame. In my mind, the only issues we have today are growth and challenges.”

While the convention center and boulevard will be a solid base to build around and the scope of the “Core to Shore” development is gargantuan, Rainbolt said the citizens of the city should expect assimilation and development of all that land to take awhile.

Regardless of economic cycles and growth problems, Rainbolt said he thinks history will judge this era in Oklahoma City very favorably.