Bible curriculum promoted by Hobby Lobby president will be taught in Mustang this fall

A Bible curriculum promoted by Hobby Lobby president will be taught at Mustang High School in the fall, with 170 students already pre-enrolled to take the elective course.
From Staff and Wire Reports Modified: April 25, 2014 at 9:53 pm •  Published: April 26, 2014
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Steve Green
Steve Green

A high school curriculum supported by Hobby Lobby chain President Steve Green, billed as a way to teach archaeology, history and the arts through Bible stories, also tells students God is always there in times of trouble and that sinners must “suffer the consequences” of disobeying.

The Mustang School Board recently voted to approve the academic curriculum for an elective course called “The Book: The Bible’s History, Narrative and Impact,” said Mustang School Superintendent Sean McDaniel. He said about 170 students have already pre-enrolled in the class.

Although the school official said the curriculum has been reviewed by the district’s attorneys to ensure that it does not proselytize or infringe on the separation of church and state, some organizations have expressed concerns that it does just that.

The Associated Press obtained a draft copy of the curriculum from the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma, which got it from the school district.

From the outset, the book describes God as eternal, “faithful and good,” “full of love” and “an ever-present help in times of trouble.” The course also says people should rest on the Sabbath because God did so after six days of creation. Green’s stores, following the same principle, are closed on Sunday.

Among the topics covered by the curriculum are the role of religion in early America, discussing the New World as a haven for those seeking to escape persecution. It also talks about the role of religion in art, citing the role of patrons such as the Catholic Church and wealthy families during the Renaissance.

The ACLU and the Freedom From Religion Foundation say using the curriculum raises constitutional issues and want the school district to reconsider.

However, McDaniel and the Rev. Michael Staton, president of the Mustang Ministerial Alliance, said they expect some people will be concerned about the curriculum, but it does not violate constitutional guidelines.

“Anytime you introduce the word ‘Bible’ into a public school, there are going to be eyebrows that raise and we anticipate that,” McDaniel said.

“Our obligation as a district is to make sure that we don’t put our board or our teacher or our administrators in a position where they’re doing something that is outside the perimeters of the law. We’ve been in touch with our attorneys and we’ve made sure that every step we’ve taken will lead to a place where we all feel like we’re abiding by the law, we’re being fair, we’re being balanced with the approach and the delivery of the curriculum and that we’re not delivering a religious perspective to our kids. Not only is that not the intent, we will be watching this very closely to make sure that does not happen.”

Staton, senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Mustang, shared similar sentiments.

He said it’s important to emphasize that the Bible course, as an elective, is not required. Staton added that he is aware that the optional nature of the course still may not appease some people.

“I think certainly there will be some pushback probably from some within the community and certainly, from those outside the community. My guess would be that the primary opposition to it would be, ‘We don’t want anything with the Bible or Christianity in a public school,’” Staton said.

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