Big 12 to experiment with eighth official this season

The extra official has one primary job. In this age of hurryup offenses, of quick snaps and frantic substitutions, the alternate ref is being asked to retrieve the ball and set it ready for play as quickly as possible.
by Berry Tramel Published: July 18, 2013
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IRVING, Texas — In 1983, college football added another man to officiating crews. Went from six to seven.

Remember the 1983 game. Lots of  power football, with tight ends and wingbacks and only occasional downfield passing. Lots of option football, heavy on the vertical, light on the horizontal.

Thirty years later, the game has changed. Formations stretch from sideline to shining sideline. Five receivers often zip into pass patterns ranging from deep to wide, with quarterbacks running every which way and players spread all over the field.

And we're still using seven officials.

Except this season in Big 12 games. The conference will experiment with eight officials, placing an “alternate referee” in the offensive backfield, on whichever side the referee doesn't occupy.

And the extra official has one primary job. In this age of hurryup offenses, of quick snaps and frantic substitutions, the alternate ref is being asked to retrieve the ball and set it ready for play as quickly as possible.

“It's not officials' role to say, ‘we're going too fast,'” said Walt Anderson, the Big 12's director of officiating. “I would tell this to coaches: ‘It's your game. You play it how you want to play it. My job is to figure out how to keep up with it.'”

The up-tempo offenses have created stress on officials, who must determine when the ball can be snapped, determine whether the defense has been given time to substitute if the offense has done the same.

And Big 12 teams play up-tempo. Huddles are as passe' as tearaway jerseys. OSU, OU, West Virginia, Baylor, Texas Tech. All have forged identities as no-huddle, hurryup offenses.

The Big 12 experimented with eight officials in the Stillwater spring game — Anderson himself was the alternate ref — and it seemed to help. At times that Saturday, the Cowboys averaged only seven seconds between the end of the previous play and the snap of the next.

Anderson said new State offensive coordinator Mike Yurcich was “very emphatic” before the spring game on how the new process would work. “We're going to be fast,” Yurcich told Anderson. “You don't understand,” Yurcich reiterated. “We're going to work fast.”

Anderson just told Yurcich, let's get together after the game and let the officials know if OSU's offense had to wait.

Anderson said Gundy later told him that the officials ended up waiting on the offense.

Anderson said the “sense from other officials on the field, it was giving everybody more time. We're not creating more time; the pace of the game is the same.”

What that means is that in the up-tempo game, the seven officials were running for their life. The extra set of eyes and hands and feet helps everything get accomplished a little more quickly.

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by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The Oklahoman,...
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