Bike fashion
Ditch the spandex for new commuter clothes

AIMEE BLANCHETTE
McClatchy Tribune News Service
Modified: May 9, 2013 at 3:49 pm •  Published: May 9, 2013
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photo - For those who use bicycles for commuting to work or errands, cycling fashion is going from spandex to multi-functional such as this Tired Ol' Belt made from recycled bike parts. (Courtney Perry/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT)
For those who use bicycles for commuting to work or errands, cycling fashion is going from spandex to multi-functional such as this Tired Ol' Belt made from recycled bike parts. (Courtney Perry/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT)

Johnny Woodside’s cycling clothes are almost as cool as his name. The 30-year-old Minneapolis hydrogeologist dons flannel shirts, Red Wing boots and has a tapered mustache. Forget the blinding neon spandex get-up.

“The last thing I want to do is walk into the bar and hear, ‘Lance Armstrong’s here!’?” said Woodside, who bikes to work, to happy hour and everywhere in between.

As more people trade four wheels for two, retailers are courting bike lovers by tapping into the cycling lifestyle. From boutiques that carry commuter-friendly clothing lines to hip bike hangouts with craft beer and coffee, every corner of the local cycling scene has a pit stop for people with a fashion sense.

“It’s not a bunch of bike geeks anymore,” said Luke Breen, owner of Calhoun Cycle in Uptown Minneapolis.

Minneapolis has the nation’s second-highest bike commuter rate behind Portland, Ore. — and the number is growing. Bike traffic in the city rose by 47 percent between 2007 and 2011, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Twin Cities area is home to a busy schedule of bike events that bring together this well-dressed community. The recent Artcrank show drew more than 6,000 people to celebrate bikes, posters and fashion. The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is often overrun with cyclists for its annual Bike Night (July 18).

But for most who attend these gatherings, bike fashion is more than a passing fad.

“The bike has become a part of my identity,” said Katrina Wollet, a 24-year-old marketing specialist who gave up her car last month, but not her style. “Just like clothing, it’s an extension of my taste, personality and lifestyle.”

To feed this common philosophy, grease-stained repair shops are transforming into stylish hangouts. With its mix of bikes and artisanal coffee, Angry Catfish has become a thriving hub of local bike culture in south Minneapolis.

Over at the new Handsome Cycles shop in Minneapolis’ North Loop, smart wool is the new Lycra. Custom bike frames line the back of the store. In front, tables display neutral-colored streetwear designed for cycling: from jeans with reflective lining and hidden pockets to polo shirts that will take you from the bike to the golf course. One wall features an impressive collection of shoes — even waterproof leather options for a business suit.

Looking for jerseys plastered with sponsorships or loud prints?

“Not here. So much of that stuff is just so ugly,” said Handsome co-owner Ben Morrison. “A full Lycra kit looks great on you if you’re 6 foot 1 and 150 pounds. But for most people it’s not comfortable and it’s just not them.”

SUIT AND TIE (AND CYCLE)

Until recently, commuting to work often meant packing an extra set of clothes and announcing your arrival at the office in an outfit of unflattering spandex and clickety-clack cycling shoes.

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