Bill would OK Internet gambling across state lines

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 3, 2013 at 4:59 pm •  Published: February 3, 2013
Advertisement
;

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The nation's gambling capital is taking steps to make sure it is not dealt out of the lucrative online poker market as more states enter the bourgeoning industry.

Soon after the Nevada Legislature begins its four-month session on Monday, lawmakers are expected to begin debating a bill that would let companies offering online poker in Nevada accept wagers from players in other states.

Such betting is essentially banned in most of the nation, but several states, including California and New Jersey, are weighing bills that would legalize some types of online gambling. The Nevada proposal, known as Assembly Bill 5, is intended to position Nevada-based companies to expand their customer base as other states ease restrictions. It's one of a handful of gambling bills lawmakers will be asked to consider but it's by far the most important.

Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval requested the change in his State of the State address in January and the Nevada Gaming Control Board drafted the legislation, which officials see as a potential moneymaker. Nevada currently permits online poker but no other type of internet gambling, so the agreements would apply only to poker.

"I think this is something that could help our state. Otherwise I don't think you'd see this kind of interest in it," Gaming Control Board Chairman A.G. Burnett said. "This is something that would go out and allow our operators to be as competitive as they can be."

The proposal builds on state regulations from 2011 that established a framework for Nevada companies to offer online poker.

The bill would allow Sandoval to reach agreement with other governors to share virtual customers. Subsequent legislation may one day allow the state to join the international global gambling community.

"I would say the ability of the governor to enter into that kind of agreement, whether it is international or domestic, is extremely important," Burnett said.

About 85 countries have legalized online gambling, and online players are believed to wager as much as $35 billion worldwide each year, according to estimates by American Gaming Association lobbyist Frank Fahrenkopf Jr.

The bill comes on the heels of a failure to pass federal online gambling regulations in Congress.

Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., made a push for sweeping legislation as the congressional session drew to a close in December, but ultimately ran out of time to unite the many factions with a stake in the issue.

Reid, the Senate majority leader, has said he will renew his efforts this year. But statehouses and entrepreneurs already are moving ahead on their own, creating a state-by-state patchwork that industry leaders had sought to avoid.

Nevada's existing online gambling regulations stipulate that companies will not be allowed to accept wagers across state lines until Congress or the U.S. Department of Justice takes regulatory action. Assembly Bill 5 would get rid of that requirement. Burnett said he did not anticipate any conflict with federal law.