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Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School is latest Oklahoma school to take on iPad learning trend

Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School in Oklahoma City became the latest in a growing number of schools whose students will utilize electronic tablets to learn.
by Graham Lee Brewer Modified: September 3, 2014 at 9:26 pm •  Published: September 3, 2014
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photo - 
Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School junior Anne Marie Engel on Tuesday works on her iPad. McGuinness issued iPads to all its students this year. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman
  Steve Gooch - 
The Oklahoman
Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School junior Anne Marie Engel on Tuesday works on her iPad. McGuinness issued iPads to all its students this year. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman Steve Gooch - The Oklahoman

School backpacks, your days may be numbered.

At least, that’s the case at Oklahoma City’s Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School, where Principal David Morton said he’s seeing fewer and fewer students carrying backpacks as they roam the halls between classes.

The reason? This is the first school year McGuinness has issued iPads to all of its students. The school’s pupils are now storing class work and text books on their digital devices.

They join a growing number of state students whose class work will be performed mainly on an electronic tablet device.

“Certainly iBooks and e-books, the greater availability and how interactive those books are, it’s a great learning tool,” Morton said. “The other side of that is what it presents to the kids. It presents, I think, another dimension of learning.”

A survey by the state Education Department conducted last year found 36 of the state’s 517 school districts have a policy in place allowing all students to perform learning activities on an electronic device, whether it is an iPad, Android tablet or laptop. Many other districts offers tablet-type devices to at least some students or grade levels.

Morton said about 70 percent of class work at McGuinness will be done on the devices. That means students are now more likely to upload apps than they are to load up backpacks with heavy textbooks and binders.

To outfit McGuinness students with iPads, leaders at the private school turned to parents. Morton said parents purchased their own iPads. The school also provides the option to lease the devices for a small monthly fee until the end of the school year, when the students will own them.

Some public school districts in the state have turned to bond issues to fund such technology upgrades.

Last school year, the Putnam City School District used proceeds from a $6 million bond issue to equip its students with about 11,000 devices, ranging from full-size iPads for older students to mini iPads for kindergarten students.

And in Calumet, school district officials used a little more than $200,000 in bond money last school year to pay for 360 iPads for all of the district’s students and teachers.

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by Graham Lee Brewer
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Graham Lee Brewer began his career as a journalist covering Oklahoma's vibrant music scene in 2006. After working as a public radio reporter for KGOU and then Oklahoma Watch, where he covered areas such as immigration and drug addiction, he went...
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