Bitstrips amuses, annoys as its comics go viral

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 24, 2014 at 4:06 pm •  Published: January 24, 2014
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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Bitstrips may seem like a sudden sensation now that the app maker's comic vignettes are all over Facebook and other social networks. But the Toronto startup's success was a drawn-out process.

The concept for a mobile application that lets people turn their lives into comic strips took shape as a high school diversion more than 20 years ago. That's when Jacob Blackstock drew a profane spoof of Charlie Brown and Lucy Van Pelt from the "Peanuts" comic strip and passed it to Shahan Panth, who sat behind him in 12th-grade English class. Even though a teacher reprimanded them for boorish behavior, a snickering Panth encouraged Blackstock to continue expressing his irreverent take on life through comics.

The two friends remained in touch after high school, often relying on comics as a way to communicate and needle each other. When Panth landed his first job out of college at an insurance company, Blackstock made it a point to fax a crude comic featuring his friend each day.

"I can't even repeat some of the things that he would say in those comics, but it was as about bad as you can possibly imagine," Panth says.

Goofing off eventually turned into a business. In 2007, Blackstock and Panth decided to start Bitstrips in an attempt to create a comic-strip version of YouTube. Bitstrips remained a novelty service confined to customizing comics within Web browsers until Oct., when the company released a mobile application for iPhones, iPads and devices running on Android software.

But Blackstock, 38, and Panth, 39, are getting the last laugh as their once-quirky pastime turns into a worldwide phenomenon. More than 30 million people in 90 countries have turned themselves into comic-book characters on Bitstrips' mobile applications. Google, which tracks people's interests through its widely used search engine, rated Bitstrips as the trendiest app of 2013, eclipsing the likes of Twitter's Vine video app, Facebook's Instragram photo app, King.com's Candy Crush game and SnapChat's ephemeral messaging app.

"A ridiculous amount of people have been loving Bitstrips so much that many of them are sharing their comics to the point that it can be overwhelming to those that aren't into it," said Blackstock, who is Bitstrips' CEO and creative director.