Boise City's Win-Win Week efforts stretched far beyond one week

Boise City raised more money than any other Class B school participating in Win-Win Week last year. After the strong response, a local fund was established to help offset the costs of people in the area who have to travel long distances for treatment.
by Scott Wright Published: September 15, 2013
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According to the all-knowing Google, it's 328 miles from the center of town in Boise City, in the western part of the Oklahoma Panhandle, to the Stephenson Cancer Center at the OU Health Sciences Center on the east side of downtown Oklahoma City.

But distance doesn't matter in Win-Win Week, which kicks off Monday across the state. The fourth-annual collaborative effort of the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association and the Stephenson Cancer Center, Win-Win Week is used to showcase cancer awareness and prevention among high school students who use their athletic events for the cause.

The fall sports of football, volleyball, softball, cross country and fall baseball are used to promote cancer awareness and to raise money for the fight against cancer.

Sitting 328 miles away from the cancer patients it was helping, Boise City — a high school with an average daily attendance of 81.29 students — raised more money than any other Class B school participating in Win-Win Week last year to claim the state championship for the class.

But the impact of the event went even further. After the strong response to Win-Win Week, a local fund was established to help offset the costs of people in the area who have to travel long distances for treatment — perhaps the 328 miles to the Stephenson Cancer Center.

In addition to Boise City, seven other schools were named state champions last year: Canton (Class A), Mounds (2A), Lexington and Purcell (3A), Tecumseh (4A), Del City (5A) and Southmoore (6A).

All over the state this week and beyond, a broad array of events are planned at high school sporting events to signify the fight against cancer. Fundraisers will be held, and athletes will be seen wearing pink wristbands or socks or other accessories to promote the events for cancer awareness.


by Scott Wright
Reporter
A lifelong resident of the Oklahoma City metro area, Scott Wright has been on The Oklahoman staff since 2005, covering a little bit of everything on the state's sports scene. He has been a beat writer for football and basketball at Oklahoma and...
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