Boy Scouts misconduct files contain several Oklahoma cases

The Boy Scouts, under court order, last week released more than 14,500 pages of confidential files on cases of alleged sexual misconduct across the country dating from 1959-85. The files include the names of nine Oklahoma-based Scouting officials alleged to have engaged in child sexual abuse
by Nolan Clay and Phillip O'Connor Published: October 23, 2012
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Recently released “perversion files” maintained by the Boy Scouts of America include the names of nine Oklahoma-based Scouting officials alleged to have engaged in child sexual abuse.

The Oklahoma cases occurred between 1964 and 1985 and took place across the state.

The Boy Scouts, under court order, last week released more than 14,500 pages of confidential files on cases of alleged sexual misconduct across the country dating from 1959 to 1985.

In a number of cases nationwide, the allegations were later substantiated. But the Portland, Ore., law firm that made the files available on its website stressed that in many cases, no such substantiation occurred. The law firm said it could not verify or attest to the truth of the allegations.

The Boy Scouts created the secret files as way to register Scout leaders accused of such misconduct.

The Scouts considered the files internal documents. Because of their confidential nature, Scout leaders did not always share the information with authorities.

Oklahoma cases

In some instances, the Oklahoma files relate the efforts of local Scouting officials to notify superiors of criminal charges filed against local Scoutmasters and to have them banned from the organization.

But in other instances, Scout leaders apparently made no effort to notify law enforcement of alleged crimes.

In at least one case, a Sentinel Scoutmaster accused of sexually abusing a Scout on a campout in 1974 was confronted by the school principal and released from his job as a special-education teacher after he did not deny the conduct.

While Scout officials forwarded James Dhalluin Jr.'s name to higher-ups for inclusion on the “confidential list,” no indication is given that Dhalluin, then 36, was reported to law enforcement authorities.


by Nolan Clay
Sr. Reporter
Nolan Clay was born in Oklahoma and has worked as a reporter for The Oklahoman since 1985. He covered the Oklahoma City bombing trials and witnessed bomber Tim McVeigh's execution. His investigative reports have brought down public officials,...
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by Phillip O'Connor
Enterprise Editor
O'Connor joined the Oklahoman staff in June, 2012 after working at The Kansas City Star and St. Louis Post-Dispatch for a combined 28 years. O'Connor, an Oklahoma City resident, is a graduate of Kansas State University. He has written frequently...
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