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  • 'Mind blowing' flames destroy homes in Washington state

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) — From just across the Wenatchee River, Dominick Bonny watched a whole neighborhood in his central Washington town burn as a wildfire destroyed two dozen homes and forced hundreds to flee. "With the wind blowing away from us, it was like we were watching a natural disaster within arm's reach," he said. Wildfires hit parts of central and eastern Washington over the weekend as the state is struggling with a severe drought. Mountain snowpack is at extremely low levels, and about one-fifth of the state's rivers and streams are at record low levels. Eastern Washington has been experiencing temperatures into the 100s, and last week Washington Gov.

  • Indonesian military says air force plane crashes in residential neighborhood of Medan city

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesian military says air force plane crashes in residential neighborhood of Medan city.

  • Put Pete Rose in Cooperstown, just not the Hall of Fame

    BY BERRY TRAMEL Columnist btramel@oklahoman.com | Updated: 4 hr ago

    The Pete Rose debate is back in the public marketplace, and the irony is deep. Rose is back in the news because he bet on baseball while he was a player. Puts a new meaning into the term, Charlie Hustle. ESPN’s Outside the Lines obtained a notebook that shows Rose’s betting practices, including betting on baseball and betting on Reds games while playing for Cincinnati. Rose agreed to a lifetime ban from baseball in 1989 after a Major League Baseball investigation determined he bet on his team to win while managing the club. For 15 years, Rose maintained that he never bet on baseball. But in 2004, Rose admitted to betting on baseball but said he bet only while a manager, not as a player. Now we know differently.

  • Dodgers fall in rain-shortened game

    FROM STAFF REPORTS | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Hard rain cost the Oklahoma City Dodgers a chance to rally Monday night as they fell 4-2 to the Nashville Sounds after five innings. The Sounds scored three runs on the bottom of the third. The rally proved to be enough to win. Oklahoma City had a lead two batters into the game. Darnell Mayberry led off with a double and Darwin Barney singled him in. The Dodgers seemed to be threatening for a big inning after Corey Seager’s single, but consecutive strikeouts and a groundout ended the inning. Extra-base hits evened the score for Nashville in the second as Jason Pridie started the inning with a triple and scored on Jake Smolinski’s double.

  • MLB NOTEBOOK

    Compiled by Nathan Ruiz from web and wire reports | Updated: 4 hr ago

    Orioles shut down former Owasso standout Bundy Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter announced Monday that the team’s top prospect, former Owasso pitcher Dylan Bundy, could be shut down for the rest the season due to inflammation in his right shoulder. Bundy, working his way back from 2013 Tommy John surgery, hasn’t pitched since May 21. He was told to stop throwing due to the inflammation, according to MLB.com. “He’s just kind of shut down for the near future, for a while. Kind of let everything calm down, see where we are,” Showalter told MLB.com. “But, depending on how you look at it, probably as good of news (on the MRI) as you can expect. I obviously know a lot more than I’m going to talk about.

  • Celebrating mud

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    Dozens of children joined the Myriad Botanical Gardens on Monday in celebrating International Mud Day. Officials with the gardens said research shows that a particular strain of bacterium in soil actually makes you happier, healthier and even smarter! So, children were invited to dig in. Children were able to make mud pies, mud paintings and mud sculptures during the event.

  • State senator receives deferred sentence

    BY JENNIFER PALMER Staff Writer jpalmer@oklahoman.com | Updated: 4 hr ago

    WOODWARD — A state senator who was found sleeping in his parked pickup and smelling of alcohol in December pleaded no contest last week to a misdemeanor. Sen. Bryce Marlatt, R-Woodward, was charged with actual physical control of a vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicating substance.  Under a deal with prosecutors, Marlatt agreed to pay a $250 fine, about $1,000 in court costs and $150 in restitution. He also was ordered to complete a drug and alcohol evaluation within six months. Marlatt, 38, received a deferred sentence. Following the Dec. 2 arrest, Marlatt's attorney issued a statement noting the senator had taken a prescription sleep aid, and had a mixed drink earlier in the evening.

  • Oklahoma gay rights supporter hits brakes on license plate fight

    BY JENNIFER PALMER Staff writer jpalmer@oklahoman.com | Updated: 4 hr ago

    An Edmond man is ending his pursuit of a personalized license plate supporting gay rights.  Despite once declaring he would take his fight to the state Supreme Court if needed, John P. Keefe II has discontinued legal action against the Oklahoma Tax Commission for denying him a vanity plate that reads “LGBTALY,” an abbreviation for lesbian gay bisexual and transgender ally. A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a Texas case involving a Confederate flag license plate diminished the chance of a favorable outcome here, Keefe said. In that case, the Texas Sons of Confederate Veterans sought a specially designed plate featuring a Confederate battle flag. A Texas state board denied the request, saying the message

  • Federal ethanol mandate becoming a regulatory farce

    The Oklahoman Editorial | Updated: 10 hr ago

    IF you want a glimpse of government dysfunction, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better example than the federal renewable-fuel mandate. A recent congressional hearing showed the law is being implemented in ways that are both haphazard and unrealistic. Passed in 2005 and 2007, the Renewable Fuel Standard requires that 35 billion gallons of ethanol-equivalent biofuels and 1 billion gallons of biomass-based diesel be refined by 2022. When the law was enacted, officials assumed U.S. fuel consumption would increase and domestic oil production would decrease as a share of supply. Lawmakers were wrong on both counts. Consumption declined during the recession and the hydraulic fracturing revolution unleashed domestic supply.

  • Records

    Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    Oklahoma County public records for June 30, 2015

  • Religious, gay rights must coexist

    MICHAEL GERSON | Updated: 10 hr ago

    WASHINGTON — It is often the fate of conservatives to be concerned about the fire code and occupancy limit at someone else’s party. Never more conspicuously than concerning the Supreme Court’s gay marriage decision, Obergefell v. Hodges. With many friends and relatives celebrating the outcome, judicial conservatives are generally anxious about the process.

  • 'I'm ready'

    BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@oklahoman.com | Updated: 4 hr ago

    In an upstairs room in their nearly century-old Gatewood neighborhood home, Ed Primeau places a twin hospital bed in front of two large windows offering his wife, Shannon, a view of the street below. To those around her, Primeau, owner of Everything Goes Dance Studio, has exuded an almost unnerving calm since March 2, the day her doctor told her that six rounds of chemo had failed and that inoperable tumors had spread throughout her body. The intervening weeks had been a parade of visits to the hospital for this procedure, that procedure, some other procedure. On May 3, doctors had discharged Primeau for what everyone knew was the final time.

  • Yukon's Freedom Fest offers two days of fun, fireworks

    By Matt Patterson Staff Writer The Oklahoman mpatterson@oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    Freedom Fest activities on Friday and Saturday in Yukon will include a fireworks display.

  • Wild Care holds animal emergency exercise

    By Melissa Pearson For The Oklahoman | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    About 20 volunteers from the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps operated under the direction of the state Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry’s incident command team to assist Wild Care staff and volunteers in moving 295 animals into the rehabilitation and education building.

  • Old costumes star in sale at Oklahoma City University

    FROM STAFF REPORTS | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    Oklahoma City University's drama and musical theater departments cleaned out old costumes and props and held a public sale for people interested in purchasing costumes that had been used in past productions.

  • Michael Gerson: Religious and gay rights must coexist

    MICHAEL GERSON | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    WASHINGTON — It is often the fate of conservatives to be concerned about the fire code and occupancy limit at someone else's party. Never more conspicuously than concerning the Supreme Court's gay marriage decision, Obergefell v. Hodges. With many friends and relatives celebrating the outcome, judicial conservatives are generally anxious about the process.

  • Supreme Court reverts to form with Oklahoma execution ruling

    The Oklahoman Editorial | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    THE U.S. Supreme Court reverted to form Monday in upholding Oklahoma’s method of lethal execution. After a week that had pundits declaring the court might be swerving to the left, the conservative bloc of justices cleared the way for Oklahoma to continue its method of carrying out the death penalty. In the 5-4 decision, written by Justice Samuel Alito, liberal members of the court got no help from their conservative brethren, unlike last week’s decisions that made same-sex marriage a constitutional right and upheld the insurance subsidies that are critical to the Affordable Care Act. Both those decisions were hailed by progressives who are sure to be disappointed by Monday’s ruling. This wasn’t a great surprise,

  • Federal ethanol mandate becoming a regulatory farce

    The Oklahoman Editorial | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    IF you want a glimpse of government dysfunction, you’d be hard-pressed to find a better example than the federal renewable-fuel mandate. A recent congressional hearing showed the law is being implemented in ways that are both haphazard and unrealistic. Passed in 2005 and 2007, the Renewable Fuel Standard requires that 35 billion gallons of ethanol-equivalent biofuels and 1 billion gallons of biomass-based diesel be refined by 2022. When the law was enacted, officials assumed U.S. fuel consumption would increase and domestic oil production would decrease as a share of supply. Lawmakers were wrong on both counts. Consumption declined during the recession and the hydraulic fracturing revolution unleashed domestic supply.

  • Edmond Elks Lodge celebrates Flag Day

    By Les Cummings For The Oklahoman | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    On June 12 the Edmond Elks Lodge performed the annual Flag Day ceremony.

  • Oklahoma gay rights supporter hits brakes on license plate fight

    BY JENNIFER PALMER Staff writer jpalmer@oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, Jun 30, 2015

    Despite once declaring he would take his fight to the Oklahoma Supreme Court, John P. Keefe II has dropped legal action against the Oklahoma Tax Commission for denying him a plate that reads "LGBTALY," an abbreviation for lesbian gay bisexual and transgender ally.