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BRAZIL BEAT: Waffle House vs Belgian waffles

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 30, 2014 at 6:06 pm •  Published: June 30, 2014
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SALVADOR, Brazil (AP) — Waffle House doesn't serve Belgian waffles and certainly won't start now.

The Georgia-based restaurant chain took to its Twitter account Monday to proclaim, "We don't believe in Belgium waffles." Or Belgian waffles, as a follower quickly corrected. But the sentiment, a riff on American fans' "I believe that we will win" chant," was popular a day before the U.S. faces Belgium in the World Cup.

Restaurant spokeswoman Meghan Irwin says it's all in good fun. Earlier, when a follower asked for the restaurant's opinion on Belgian waffles, it tweeted: "We dominate them."

Waffle House serves American-style waffles. Belgian waffles are bigger with a lighter batter.

In Belgium, waffles have been a part of the diet for centuries. But so-called Belgian waffles aren't really served in that country. There are Brussels waffles and Liege waffles.

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CHEAP TRAVEL

SAO PAULO (AP) — Travel doesn't get any cheaper than the Argentine fans who have covered more than 1,000 miles in motorhomes and vans for days even without having tickets.

Penniless musicians, hitchhikers and other devoted fans began arriving Monday at the parking lot of Sao Paulo's Sambadrome, a venue used for Carnival parades that the city opened for them to camp. Argentina is playing against Switzerland in the city's Itaquerao Stadium on Tuesday to advance to quarterfinals.

Some fans wearing light blue and white were making noodles in a shabby pot.

"That's what we have been eating every day," said 48-year-old Fritz Latzina, who called himself a "professional fan," putting nearly 3,800 kilometers on his RV since he left Buenos Aires on June 11.

Mariano Bellotti, 22, had been hitchhiking with his friend for the past six months traveling from their native Mar de Plata.

"We thought this year we will be champions, so let's make it a trip, work odd jobs and live it to the fullest from the start," he said.

They couldn't afford the tickets, but they will hit the Fan Fests to support the players.

One of the vans parked at the Sambadrome stands out because of a giant sticker on its hood of Pope Francis with an Argentine flag to his right and a Brazilian one to his left.

Anticipating a final between the South American rivals, van owner Jose Alberto Brizio, 63, said, "Let the best team win."

"But he is blessing the best one," said Brizio, showing with a cigarette in hand that the pope is waving at his country's flag.

— By Adriana Gomez Licon — www.twitter.com/agomezlicon

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WORLD CUP DOODLES

SAO PAULO (AP) — A bright blue letter G boots ball after ball through an O-shaped life preserver hanging from a palm tree in a makeshift version of a World Cup shootout. A red "e'' lounges on the sand, sipping a tropical beverage through a straw.

The Google "Doodle Team," as it's called, is having a blast on-site in Brazil for this World Cup, offering up soccer-themed daily animations on the home page. Multiple versions each day, in fact.

This is the first time doodles are being created outside Google's Silicon Valley headquarters in Mountain View, California. A small group of the regular doodle team is on location in Sao Paolo.

"We're basically compressing a process that normally takes a week or more into a few hours in order to keep the doodles fresh and relevant to the day's matches and football fever in general," said Ryan Germick, the Google Doodle Team Lead.

Through the tournament's initial two-plus weeks, Google had posted 36 doodles with "everything from vine-swinging referees; to egg-laying, score-keeping eagles; to a clairvoyant octopus from the great aquarium in the sky," Germick said.

Leading the efforts is doodler Matt Cruickshank. Cruickshank, Germick and fellow doodlers Sophie Diao and Leon Hong are working from a space they named the "inspiration room" in Google's Sao Paolo office. There are football collectibles, an artificial turf floor and a record player with a stack of Brazilian albums.

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