Budget passed, Legislature taking up tax cuts

Published on NewsOK Modified: April 9, 2014 at 4:04 am •  Published: April 9, 2014

PHOENIX (AP) — Just a day after adopting a $9.23 billion state budget, the Arizona House and Senate gave final approval Tuesday to a pair of tax cuts for manufacturers, including one that would give a multimillion-dollar tax credit to the world's biggest corporation to install and run a solar facility.

The Legislature approved Senate Bill 1413, pushed by Gov. Jan Brewer, eliminating sales taxes on electricity purchased by manufacturers and mining smelters. It is expected to cost the state general fund $17 million a year. Brewer called for the elimination of the tax in her State of the State address in January, saying it was needed to make Arizona more competitive and draw new manufacturing to the state.

Many lawmakers believe the other bill, SB 1484, specifically targets Apple Inc.'s planned Mesa sapphire glass manufacturing plant. It would provide a $5 million tax credit if a company installs at least $300 million in renewable power capacity to supply its plant.

That proposal drew criticism from conservative Republicans in the House, who said it was picking winners and losers among industries and subsidizing renewable energy.

"We as conservatives have got to step away from this crony capitalist style of development," said Rep. Adam Kwasman, R-Oro Valley. "We cannot afford to pick winners and losers in industry. We believe in low taxes for everybody. We believe in simple rules for everybody."

The so-called "Apple bill" could apply to at least one other manufacturer, if one materializes.

Sen. Bob Worsley, R-Mesa, carried the Apple bill, saying he did it because the Arizona Commerce Authority had made a commitment to the company as part of the deal to draw them here.

"I believe that they did the right thing to bring Apple here," Worsley said in a recent interview. "And the dollars are very small in the whole scheme of things with Apple being in the Valley. They could have gone to Texas, they could have gone other places and we wanted them here. It's a good decision."

The commerce authority, a quasi-private agency that acts as the state's economic development arm, is charged with luring companies to the state and has a series of incentive packages at its disposal.

In a statement, the Commerce Authority said it was not about one company, and not an ACA bill.

"As we understand it, the bill would make a tax credit available to all manufacturers meeting the bill's criteria, and it is a response to Arizona's renewable energy industry as well as an increasing number of manufacturers who seek to offset their power consumption through the production of renewable energy used to power their manufacturing operations in our state.