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Buffett may face questions about stock performance

Warren Buffett’s failure to beat the stock market in four of the past five years has raised the issue of whether Berkshire Hathaway’s 83-year-old CEO has lost his touch.
By JOSH FUNK, Associated Press Published: May 2, 2014
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— Warren Buffett’s failure to beat the stock market in four of the past five years has raised the issue of whether Berkshire Hathaway’s 83-year-old CEO has lost his touch.

Buffett is likely to face questions about the conglomerate’s performance when more than 30,000 shareholders gather for Berkshire’s annual meeting Saturday in Omaha.

It’s not the first time people have wondered if Buffett is off his game. Criticism of Buffett reached its peak during the 1990s tech bubble because he refused to invest in dot-com businesses he didn’t understand. Berkshire’s Class A stock sank to roughly $56,000 a share.

When the tech bubble burst, many of those businesses failed while Berkshire continued to prosper through acquisitions and investments. These days, Berkshire’s A stock trades at more than $193,000 a share.

Author and investor Jeff Matthews, who wrote “Warren Buffett’s Successor: Who It Is and Why It Matters,” says criticism of Buffett is a byproduct of where the overall market is because Berkshire tends to trail a surging stock market. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index soared 30 percent in 2013 and has nudged up another 2 percent this year.

“Buffett always looks less exciting when everyone else does great,” Matthews says.

Many investors focus too much on recent history. Critics point out that Berkshire lagged the market in four of the past five years, based on Buffett’s own yardstick. That measurement, Berkshire’s book value, gained 18.2 percent in 2013, lagging S&P 500’s rise of 32.4 percent, including dividends.

But that short-term view obscures the fact that Berkshire Hathaway has only trailed the S&P 500 10 times since Buffett took over in 1965. And cumulatively, Berkshire has delivered compounded annual gains of 19.7 percent to the S&P 500’s 9.8 percent. Berkshire is also sitting on at least $48 billion in cash.

Buffett has told investors for several years that the massive size of Berkshire makes it impossible for him to match the investment gains he delivered decades ago, but he still believes Berkshire will beat the overall market.

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