OKC Thunder: Building Kevin Durant

How strength trainer Alan Stein helped sculpt Kevin Durant from a talented young Maryland basketball player to the footsteps of stardom.
by Anthony Slater Published: August 17, 2013
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photo - Alan Stein, Kevin Durant's strength coach, spent nearly four hours putting aspiring basketball players through numerous drills at the Cutting Edge Camp at Del City High School on  Saturday,  Aug. 17, 2013. Before the players were given basketballs, Stein told them they would not be doing any dribbling or shooting drills.    Photo  by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman.
Alan Stein, Kevin Durant's strength coach, spent nearly four hours putting aspiring basketball players through numerous drills at the Cutting Edge Camp at Del City High School on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. Before the players were given basketballs, Stein told them they would not be doing any dribbling or shooting drills. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman.

Brash and confident, budding strength trainer Alan Stein walked right up to 16-year-old Kevin Durant in a Maryland high school gym.

“Look, man, you have all the tools to be one of the best players in the world, but the only way you can do that is to get stronger,” Stein recalled telling Durant back in 2005. “I can help you. Give me a shot.”

Skilled with a silky jumper and blessed with a recent growth spurt, Durant was a highly coveted 6-foot-10 hoops prospect attending nearby Oak Hill Academy, a national power.

But the current Thunder superstar wore his obvious weakness on that slender teenage frame. He was 185 pounds, rail thin and lacking on-court strength.

Anyone could identify that. But Stein had a nonbinding proposal to help fix it.

“Just come in for one workout with me and if you don't like it, you don't ever have to speak to me again,” Stein told Durant. “And I think that's what kind of gave him some assurance that I wasn't trying to take from him or latch on to him.”

These days, Stein is nationally renowned for his work in youth basketball. He's an assistant coach at DeMatha High School in the Washington, D.C., area. He has a large Twitter backing (more than 46,000 followers) to whom he delivers inspirational quotes regularly. And he travels the country during the offseason, sharing his methods and unique drills with coaches and players, including a three-hour session at Del City High School on Saturday.

But back then, he was a relative unknown with a rigorous workout plan that was unappealing to most teenagers.

That didn't include the 16-year-old Durant.

“He came in for that first workout and I busted him up pretty good,” Stein recalls.

Forty-five minutes of core work and conditioning on the court. Forty-five minutes of strength training and lifting in the weight room. No dribbling. No shooting. No skill work.

“After about 90 minutes, he lay there just absolutely exhausted and spent and I said, ‘Hey, did you have fun?' ” Stein remembered. “And he looked at me dead serious and said, ‘No, that wasn't fun. … But I know that's what I need to do to get to the next level, so when can we meet again?' That was really when it struck me how mature he was. Because most 16-year-olds don't do things that they don't like to do.”


by Anthony Slater
Thunder Beat Writer
Anthony Slater started on the Thunder beat in the summer of 2013, joining after two years as NewsOK.com's lead sports blogger and web editor. A native Californian, Slater attended Sonoma State for two years before transferring to Oklahoma State in...
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