Published on NewsOK Modified: June 13, 2014 at 4:16 pm •  Published: June 13, 2014
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GM recalling Camaros for ignition switch problem

DETROIT (AP) — Ignition switches once again are causing problems for General Motors.

This time the company is recalling nearly 512,000 Chevrolet Camaro muscle cars from the 2010 to 2014 model years because a driver's knee can bump the key and knock the switch out of the "run" position, causing an engine stall.

That disables the power steering and brakes and could cause drivers to lose control.

GM said Friday that it knows of three crashes and four minor injuries from the problem. A spokesman said the air bags did not go off in the crashes, but GM hasn't determined if the non-deployment was caused by the switches.

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Check, please: Priceline buys OpenTable for $2.6 billion

NEW YORK (AP) — Priceline has negotiated a $2.6 billion entree into the restaurant business.

The global travel booking king announced Friday it is acquiring the OpenTable Inc. in a deal that would put Priceline into a new business doing for restaurant reservations much what it does for hotel bookings.

The deal should give Priceline a new way to cater to its increasingly mobile-savvy customers, while parlaying Priceline's global reach to expand OpenTable to other countries.

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Amaya buying PokerStars, Full Tilt owner for $4.9 billion

NEW YORK (AP) — The owner and operator of the PokerStars and Full Tilt Poker brands is selling itself to Amaya Gaming Group Inc. in a $4.9 billion deal that is part of its plan to hopefully return to the U.S. market after a dustup with federal authorities three years ago.

PokerStars and Full Tilt ran into some trouble in April 2011 when the U.S government seized their websites and charged executives at the companies and people that move money for them with fraud and money laundering. In July 2012 PokerStars reached a settlement with the Justice Department in which it agreed to pay the government $547 million over three years. At the time the company said that the money was to be used in part to reimburse former U.S. customers of Full Tilt Poker, whose assets PokerStars had acquired.

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FCC examining reasons for Internet traffic jams

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission is setting out to unravel the mystery behind the Internet traffic jams bogging down the delivery of Netflix videos and other online content.

The inquiry announced Friday by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler will dissect the routes that video and other data travel to reach Internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon.

This crucial handoff of content has gained more attention in recent months as Netflix Inc. and other critics have accused the two Internet service providers of deliberately slowing incoming traffic from websites unwilling to pay for a less congested entry point.

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Spain props up soccer amid crushing austerity

VALENCIA, Spain (AP) — At the height of Spain's crushing economic crisis, the Villarreal soccer club sported an eye-catching logo across its jerseys: Aeroport Castello. The local government paid the club 20 million euros ($27 million) to promote what was to become Spain's most notorious "ghost airport" — one that hasn't seen a single flight since it opened in 2011.

The deal illustrates one of the peculiarities of Spain's meltdown: As austerity measures sap the life from health, education and welfare programs, Spain's soccer teams have been receiving hundreds of millions of dollars in government aid.

An Associated Press review of official documents shows that Spain's highly autonomous regions are helping to keep some teams alive through massive direct cash injections. Some politicians and ordinary Spaniards are questioning the generous support amid hospital downsizing, teacher layoffs and chronic delays in payments for needy people.

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China housing slump sparks fears for economy

BEIJING (AP) — Six months ago, China's housing market was so red-hot that Feng Xiaowei, a sales manager at a real estate agency in the eastern city of Hangzhou, rarely took a day off.