Cal State targets 'super seniors' with hefty fees

Associated Press Modified: November 10, 2012 at 3:31 pm •  Published: November 10, 2012
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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — They're called super seniors, and they can be found on nearly every college campus in America.

These veteran undergraduates have amassed many more units — and taken many more classes — than they need to earn a degree, with college careers that can stretch well beyond the traditional four years.

At California State University, the nation's largest four-year college system, school administrators say enough is enough. They say the 23-campus system can no longer afford to let students linger so long without collecting their diplomas.

After gentler efforts to prod super seniors toward graduation, Cal State officials want to start charging hefty fees that could almost triple the cost for students who have completed five years of full-time undergraduate work.

The CSU Board of Trustees is expected to vote on the "graduation incentive fee" when it meets in Long Beach on Tuesday. The board tabled the proposal in September after students complained and trustees raised questions.

The proposed fee — like those adopted in several other states— is aimed at encouraging students to finish their degrees faster and make room for new undergrads in an era of scarce resources. Deep budget cuts over the past four years have forced CSU to sharply raise tuition, cut academic programs and turn away tens of thousands of qualified students.

"If we can graduate more students, we can create more capacity to enroll more students," said Eric Forbes, the system's assistant vice chancellor for student academic services. "It's about access and creating more efficiency in the system."

But the idea doesn't sit well with students who say they would be punished for switching majors, adding a major or minor or getting bad academic advice. They complain that budget cuts have made it harder to get classes they need, so many students take courses they don't need just to keep their financial aid.

"Sometimes through no fault of their own, students are forced into being super seniors," said David Allison, president of the California State Student Association. "It could harm individuals who change their majors as they figure out what they want to do with their lives."

The super-senior charge is one of three proposed fees that are projected to generate $30 million in annual revenue and create space for up to 18,000 additional students. The board is also expected to vote this week on imposing new fees on students who repeat a course or take 18 or more units in one semester.

The proposed fee would be phased in over two years. It would apply to students with 160 or more semester units in fall 2013 before the threshold falls to 150 units in fall 2014. Most majors require 120 units.

Super seniors would be charged $372 per semester unit — in addition to in-state tuition of $2,985 per semester. For a full 15-unit course load, they would pay around $8,500, about what out-of-state students pay. The charge per unit would have been higher if Gov. Jerry Brown tax measure Proposition 30 had not passed on Tuesday.

The proposed fee would hit students like Danielle Parsons, a fifth-year senior at Sacramento State University. She has already surpassed 150 units and expects to exceed 180 when she graduates next spring with two majors and a minor.


by Jaclyn Cosgrove
Medical and Health Reporter
Jaclyn Cosgrove writes about health, public policy and medicine in Oklahoma, among other topics. She is an Oklahoma State University graduate. Jaclyn grew up in the southeast region of the state and enjoys writing about rural Oklahoma. She is...
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OSU-OKC Farmers Market

When: OSU-OKC's Farmers Market is open Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: OSU-OKC Horticulture Pavilion, 400 N Portland Ave.

What's there: Organic fruits and vegetables; baked goods; eggs; organic meats

Upcoming: The Farmers Market will close Dec. 29 but reopen Jan. 5 with its 2012 Food Celebration. Kamala Gamble, a local chef and organic gardener, will give cooking classes with some of the foods found at the Farmers Market. Also, vendors will have recipes at their booths that include foods they sell.

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