California releases draft fracking regulations

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 18, 2012 at 6:46 pm •  Published: December 18, 2012
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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As oil companies move to access one of the largest shale oil deposits in the country, California regulators on Tuesday released draft rules that would more tightly govern the oil recovery method known as hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking."

The proposed rules were posted online by state oil regulators and marked California's first foray into regulating the contentious practice of fracking, which involves extracting hard-to-reach gas and oil by pummeling rocks deep underground with high-pressure water, sand and chemicals.

California currently oversees oil well construction generally but had not previously required disclosure of fracking.

Under the draft regulations, operators would usually have to name the chemicals they use and test wells to ensure the drilling process could be withstood without contaminating groundwater.

Fracking has been quietly going on for decades in several counties, including Los Angeles, Kern, Monterey and Sacramento. Other states use the technique to recover natural gas.

Environmentalists worry that fracking can contaminate groundwater and pollute the air. However, the industry has said the practice has been safely used for decades.

Jason Marshall, chief deputy director of the California's Department of Conservation, said decades of fracking in California have left no evidence that groundwater has been contaminated.

"I know the absence of evidence is not proof," Marshall said. "We pride ourselves on having very good well construction standards in place that are stronger than many other states."

The release of the draft was the first step in creating new regulations at a time when the state is poised for a possible oil boom. Last week, federal land managers auctioned off nearly 18,000 acres of oil leases on public lands in Central California.

That's where California's Monterey Shale formation is located. The formation contains more than 15 billion barrels of "technically recoverable shale oil," more than the amount contained in the Bakken oil fields of Montana and North Dakota, according to a U.S. Energy Information Administration estimate.

What's not known is whether fracking is the best method for recovering the energy resource, said Tupper Hull, a spokesman for the Western States Petroleum Association.



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