Calvary Baptist Church being brought back to life as law firm

After suffering through years of unrepaired ceilings and crumbling sidewalks, the 90-year-old former Calvary Baptist Church is getting a full makeover by its new owner, the Dan Davis Law Firm.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: February 14, 2013 at 9:45 pm •  Published: February 15, 2013

After suffering through years of unrepaired ceilings and crumbling sidewalks, the 90-year-old former Calvary Baptist Church is getting a full makeover by its new owner, the Dan Davis Law Firm.

Davis' wife, Joy, admits the project was a bit daunting at first. The law firm sold its old home at NW 13 and Dewey Avenue in 2011, and the couple quickly realized finding a new home in or near downtown wouldn't be easy.

“It's harder than one might think when you need parking spaces,” Joy Davis said. “We looked at a list online of downtown properties for sale, and I wondered why hadn't we looked at this?”

It was then that Dan Davis, following on his wife's discovery, visited the church and instantly realized he had found a new home for his firm. They bought the property last March for $700,000.

“He said, ‘You've got to see this — This is it,'” Joy Davis said. “All of his advisers were saying you've got to be kidding. You're crazy.”

The church, built in 1923, was the center of the city's civil rights movement. An estimated 1,500 people attended a rally at the church in 1960 to hear a speech from Martin Luther King Jr. — and that was a few years after the congregation passed on his application to become the church's full-time pastor.

The church also was the birthplace of the sit-in movement led by Clara Luper. The teacher led youths from the church to lunch counters downtown that discriminated against black customers.

The church survived the destruction of the surrounding Deep Deuce neighborhood in the 1970s and lived to see the area's revival as downtown's leading mixed-use neighborhood.

The 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building devastated the church, blasting out windows, and the city allocated $1.4 million in federal disaster funds to assist in repairs. That work is being credited with making the current makeover possible, said J.W. Peters, Titus Construction president.

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Reporter Sr.
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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Historic neon sign is missing

As the Dan Davis Law Firm completes its renovation of the Calvary Baptist Church, its owners are determined to either find the original neon sign that stood in front of the landmark for decades or replicate it.

The late Phillip Davis, pastor of the former congregation, was criticized by Willa Johnson, now a county commissioner, and preservationists when he chose to remove the sign in 2001. At the time, he told The Oklahoman the sign was being put into storage and would eventually be brought back for display. More than a decade later, however, the sign's location is unknown.

Contractor J.W. Peters asks that anyone with information about the sign's whereabouts contact his company at 936-0000.

Construction of Calvary Baptist Church, 300 N Walnut, began in 1921 and was completed in 1923. A member of the Calvary congregation, the late Russell Benton Bingham, designed the structure.

Low arches, stained glass and symbolic representation of the word “Calvary” on a window's mullions and rails characterize the building.

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