Campaign launched in Oklahoma City proclaims anti-pornography message

The “She's Somebody's Daughter” anti-pornography campaign was recently launched in Oklahoma City to shine light on the negative affects of pornography on individuals, families and the community at large.
by Carla Hinton Modified: October 15, 2013 at 1:17 pm •  Published: October 4, 2013

An anti-pornography campaign called “She's Somebody's Daughter” was recently launched in Oklahoma City, and two special events are being planned in conjunction with the new initiative.

An “Into the Light” concert featuring contemporary Christian recording artists Clay Cross, Scott Krippayne and John and Shelli Mandeville is set for Saturday at Crossings Community Church. A public awareness event called “Shine the Light” will be held on Oct. 15 at Wheeler Park in south Oklahoma and will feature guest speakers U.S. Rep. James Lankford, R-Oklahoma City, and Wanda Pratt, mother of Oklahoma City Thunder NBA star Kevin Durant.

Steve Siler, one of the initiative's founders, said the idea behind the campaign is to start a public dialogue about pornography and the negative effects it has on individuals, families and the community at large.

“We want to open the doors to have difficult conversations about this issue,” Siler said.

“Pornography is coming after all of our marriages and all of our kids.”

He said many leaders in Oklahoma have responded well to the campaign launch on Tuesday. Gov. Mary Fallin proclaimed Tuesday “She's Somebody's Daughter Day” in Oklahoma. Tammy Stauffer, the campaign's project manager, said Oklahoma City was chosen for the launch because of the amount of human trafficking that occurs here. She said human trafficking is an issue in the city because of its interstate connections. Also, Stauffer said Oklahoma City ranks highly in searches for Internet pornography.

A billboard promoting the campaign recently was unveiled near Interstate 44 and Reno Avenue.

Stauffer said campaign leaders consider pornography to run the gamut from some lingerie commercials to violent videos on the Internet. She said the campaign, among other things, seeks to educate the public about what campaign leaders called a connection between the demand for human trafficking and pornography “because pornography is about objectification.” Campaign leaders said pornography and the objectification of women is damaging to women's self-image and self-esteem.

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by Carla Hinton
Religion Editor
Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide...
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