Campers show dramatic flair at Oklahoma City University

Oklahoma Children's Theatre at Oklahoma City University gets children involved in drama.
BY ERICA SMITH, For The Oklahoman Published: July 29, 2013
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It's Friday afternoon on the Oklahoma City University campus, and excited, energetic young superheroes are making their way to the Kirkpatrick Fine Arts Center. This is the one day a week Oklahoma Children's Theatre summer campers get to show off all their hard work for a real audience.

The theme this year is “It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Summer Camp!” and for some campers, performance day is the best part of their week.

“I like to perform for people, and we get to do plays or dances,” said Claire Davis, 9. Franklin Thiessen, 6, agreed. “My favorite part of camp is that we do a play on Friday,” he said.

According to Rozz Grigsby, community engagement and education director, an average of 1,200 children, ages 3 to 13, attend camp at Children's Theatre during the summer break. Typical summer camps are one week and special production camps are three weeks. Only the students in three-week production camps have to audition to attend.

There are many different theater-related classes offered, from musical theater to stage combat to filmmaking and even puppetry. Children who attend the entire summer have a different class each week, with a different performance every Friday. No two plays or films are alike, and the children learn more than just acting during a typical day.

“Depending on the class, typically a camp day will include movement games, team-building/ensemble-building activities, theater or specialty area lessons, play/project development, rehearsal and lots of creativity-based games and activities,” Grigsby said.

“Everything we do is hands-on experience and participation, but we do it without any performance pressure or ‘perfection pressure.' We are not trying to create the next generation of actors. If campers develop a desire to be actors, that's great, but it's not our primary goal. Our focus is on developing self-expression, increasing creative problem solving and collaboration, and encouraging the next generation of arts patrons.”

Lee Porter, 11, has been a regular camper since he was 6 years old. “(Camp) is awesome. We can learn stage combat, dance and digital stories. They do different things every week; it's never exactly the same.”