Page 2: Can we talk? With Barry Switzer

Oklahoman Published: September 2, 2009
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Q: "In the 1983 Nebraska game, when it looked like we would score at the end and have to go for two, what play were you going to call on the 2-point conversion?” — Dustin Olds, Miami, OK

Switzer: "Probably run the option, the pitch play, like we always did. Best play in football, without a doubt. It walls off everything from the inside. All you have is the tight end blocking the (defensive end). The quarterback jumps outside, if the cornerback blitzes, pitch it. Jamelle (Holieway) made a living on that play. Danny Bradley would have been fine on the play. Great play to make 2 yards.

Q: "Do you think a player of yours has ever rigged a game?” — Tim Sanders, Edmond

Switzer: "No. Players probably some time bet on damn ball games, but I don’t know that for a fact. And if they did, I think they were second-team, third-team players. I never worried about point spreads.”

Q: "Was winning the Super Bowl bittersweet after all that happened at OU?” — Allen Goodman, Oklahoma City

Switzer: "No, not really. I think about a perfect game. We made it a harder game than it needed to be. Late in the first half, they had third-and-19, they had a crossing route. Darren Woodson, for whatever reason, runs with their X receiver. All he had to do was take an 8- 10-yard drop, let them catch it and make the tackle. All he has to do is look inside for the crossing route. He should have hit him in the mouth. But we double-cover their X, the crossing route gets upfield and they go on to make it 13-7 at halftime. It should have been 13-0. That always bothered me, things like that.”

Q: "Just about every time I see an interview with a successful person, they always give the credit for their success to their parents. How much of an influence did your parents have on your life?” — Beryl Oswald

Switzer: "Not any in athletics. I was driven early on in college to prove myself, to overcome my background, what I believe it to be. I dealt with all this emotion, knowing my daddy was in prison (for bootlegging). That bothered me. Of course, I found out no one really gives a damn. They don’t think about you; they’re thinking about themselves. But for myself and them (parents), I was going to make it.”

Q: "Tell us an interesting story that no one knows about your recruitment by the University of Arkansas.” — Robert Ferrier, Norman

Switzer: "I was recruited by Bowden Wyatt starting out, but then he left. Hell, I didn’t know what to do. I was still being recruited by (LSU’s) Charlie McClendon, an assistant for Paul Dietzel, and Arkansas hadn’t shown up.