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Canada to end tankers linked to Quebec explosion

Published on NewsOK Modified: April 23, 2014 at 4:46 pm •  Published: April 23, 2014
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TORONTO (AP) — Canada said Wednesday it was phasing out the type of rail tankers involved in last summer's massive explosion of a runaway oil train that incinerated much of a town in Quebec, killing 47 people and prompting intense public pressure to make oil trains safer.

Canada's transport minister said the DOT-111 tankers, which are used to carry crude oil and ethanol and are prone to rupture, must be retired or retrofitted within three years. Transport Minister Lisa Raitt's announcement comes about nine months after more than 60 of the tankers carrying oil from North Dakota came loose in the middle of the night, sped downhill for nearly seven miles (11 kilometers) and derailed into the town of Lac-Megantic. At least five of the tankers exploded, leveling about 30 buildings, including a popular bar that was filled with revelers.

Since then, trains carrying oil also have exploded and burned in Alabama, North Dakota and New Brunswick. The rail industry is deeply integrated across North America, and Wednesday's announcement was watched closely in the U.S. Both nations' accident investigators earlier this year implored their governments to impose new safety rules.

The DOT-111 tank car is considered the staple of the North American fleet and makes up about 70 percent of all tankers on the rails. But the concerns surrounding the tanks are not new, and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has been urging replacing or retrofitting the tank cars since 1991. The more recent, fiery explosions have brought the public's attention to the problem.

Raitt said the least crash-resistant of the older DOT-111 tank cars, about 5,000 of them, must be removed from the rails immediately.

"Three years is the amount of time that we thought was the best saw off between what industry said that they could do and what is wanted by the Transportation Safety Board," Raitt said.

The three-year phase out will affect about 65,000 tank cars in North America, including a third or a quarter in Canada. Raitt said the industry thinks the three year phase out is "ambitious."

The transport minister announced the changes in response to recommendations by Canada's Transportation Safety Board in the aftermath of the Quebec tragedy.

Canada's safety board has said a long phase-out would not be good enough. Safety experts have said the soda-can shaped car has a tendency to split open during derailments and other major accidents.

Rail carriers will also be required to prepare emergency response assistance plans for shipments of all petroleum products, including everything for crude oil to diesel. Trains will also be forced to slow as they moved through communities.

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