Cancer, rape fraud case bowls over Mich. community

Published on NewsOK Modified: May 17, 2013 at 3:56 pm •  Published: May 17, 2013
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LEXINGTON, Mich. (AP) — Carol Connell remembers well the gift she gave Sara Ylen, a friend seemingly forced to bear too much misery. Ylen, a Michigan mother of two young boys, said she was battling cancer just a few years after a man was convicted of her rape.

"It was a little box, a very ornate box, to hold a prayer. She needed God to look over her," Connell said, recalling the 2008 lunch when she gave Ylen the jewelry. "Sara was visibly touched."

Connell now can't help but wonder whether Ylen was showing gratitude or simply perpetuating years of jaw-dropping deceit.

Ylen's community, which had come to admire her as the subject of a newspaper's award-winning 2003 series about surviving a rape, rallied when her cancer diagnosis became public. Churches sold Super Bowl sub sandwiches and auction items to raise money. Friends cut her grass, bathed her at her modest home and provided hot meals. An insurance company paid nearly $100,000 for hospice care.

Now the 38-year-old is charged with fraud, false pretenses and using a computer to commit a crime after state police found no doctor who diagnosed cancer. The charges come as those who regularly helped Ylen reel from the news that the man who spent nearly 10 years in prison for her rape was released last year, after newly discovered evidence cast doubt on whether she'd ever been attacked.

"The fact that she's lived this long is a miracle. But maybe it wasn't a miracle after all. ... I'm just baffled. Is she the biggest con artist in the state of Michigan or the victim?" Connell said.

The fraud case isn't Ylen's only concern. In a neighboring county, she is charged with making a false report of rape just last year, even using makeup to create bruises.

Ylen (pronounced WHY'-len) and her attorney, Dave Heyboer, have not returned phone messages seeking comment. The Associated Press went to a Lexington address listed in court documents, but she no longer lives there.

The two cases against Ylen come years after she first emerged in the public eye in the Port Huron area, 60 miles northeast of Detroit.

In 2002, Ylen told police she had been raped in broad daylight in a Meijer store parking lot more than a year earlier.

There was no surveillance video, physical evidence or witnesses. James Grissom, an off-duty Meijer employee with a past sex-related conviction, was charged after Ylen said her attacker, like Grissom, had a skull tattoo. He was found guilty in 2003 and sentenced to at least 15 years in prison, an enhanced punishment because Ylen said her attacker gave her a sexually transmitted disease.

Next, Ylen told her story to the Port Huron Times Herald. She said she wanted people to see her as a "victor," not a "victim." Readers inspired by "Sara's Story," as the series was titled, started a fund to send her to community college.

But it didn't take long for Ylen's story to start unraveling. Authorities learned she claimed to have been kidnapped and raped while visiting her parents in Bakersfield, Calif., just months after the alleged parking lot attack back in Michigan. No charges were filed.

"My daughter likes to have a lot of attention," her father, Dale Hill, told Bakersfield officers in a 2001 police report that wasn't uncovered until after Grissom's trial. Hill told the AP this week that he hasn't spoken to his daughter in years and didn't know anything about her recent claims.

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