Cases of illegal re-entry after deportation still on the rise in Oklahoma City court

So far this year, 10 illegal re-entry cases have been filed in federal court in Oklahoma City. On Jan. 5, 15 defendants were indicted, pleaded guilty, or were sentenced on charges of unlawful re-entry into the United States.
BY VALLERY BROWN vbrown@opubco.com Modified: January 30, 2011 at 8:28 am •  Published: January 30, 2011
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The stakes were high for a Honduran man as he sat in a patrol car after being pulled over for drunken driving.

Hector Mercado-Castellanos, 42, was in the United States illegally. He had returned to Oklahoma City after being deported in 2004 for three drunken driving convictions and attempting to elude a police officer.

His son, Hector Escalante, 18, ambushed Oklahoma City police officer Katie Lawson after she responded to the drunken driving call on Aug. 29, prosecutors say. The 28-year-old officer was shot several times with a semi-automatic rifle but survived.

Thursday, Mercado-Castellanos was sentenced in Oklahoma City federal court to 16 months in prison for re-entering the United States illegally after previously being deported. He is among a growing number of people who are being prosecuted for illegal re-entry after deportation.

Growing trend

So far this year, 10 illegal re-entry cases have been filed in federal court in Oklahoma City. On Jan. 5, a total of 15 defendants were indicted, pleaded guilty, or were sentenced on charges of unlawful re-entry into the United States.

In 2008, 13 were filed the entire year. That numbered jumped to 26 in 2009 and 54 last year.

Felons who unlawfully return to the country after being deported can face federal prison sentences of up to 10 years. Then, they're deported again. Violent felonies can drive sentences up to 20 years.

Federal prosecutors do not often lose these cases. In fact, most never make it to trial, said Bob Troester, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office in Oklahoma City.

“The fact that they're here is like ‘exhibit A,'” Troester said. “As a general matter, most of them end up pleading out.”

And many of them, like Mercado-Castellanos, end up coming back again for family, work and other reasons.

Of those indicted this month, several had been deported and returned three or four times, court records show.

Dan Kowalski, a Texas-based immigration attorney and editor of Bender's Immigration Bulletin, said it's a no-brainer why many take the risks.



AT A GLANCE

Unlawful re-entry cases prosecuted

2008: 13.

2009: 26.

2010: 54.

Jan. 1 to Jan. 27, 2011: 10 indictments.

In January:

4: Number of guilty pleas for illegal re-entry.

16-33: Range of prison sentences in years given to three convicted defendants this month.

4: Highest number of deportations for a single defendant.

Source: U.S. Attorneys Office Western District records

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