Cellphones are sought-after items in Oklahoma prisons, officials say

Inmates smuggling cellphones into Oklahoma prisons wasn't that big a deal 10 years ago. But today, cellphones have become one of the most sought-after contraband items in Oklahoma's prisons.
by Andrew Knittle Modified: November 11, 2012 at 9:11 pm •  Published: November 12, 2012

Inmates smuggling cellphones into Oklahoma prisons wasn't that big a deal 10 years ago.

But today, cellphones have become one of the most sought-after contraband items in Oklahoma's prisons. Just since 2010, the number of cellphones confiscated by prison staff has grown considerably.

Through September of this year, corrections staff members already have snatched up 1,833 cellphones at Oklahoma's prisons. In 2010, there were just 1,070 cellphones confiscated by prison staff, while there were 1,383 in 2011.

Prison officials say cellphones are sought-after because they allow inmates to have unmonitored conversations — whenever they want. It also helps inmates smuggle in things such as drugs, cigarettes and other coveted items prisoners pay steep prices to get their hands on.

“The more cellphones you have in the hands of prisoners, the more drugs, cigarettes and other contraband you're going to see,” Corrections Department spokesman Jerry Massie said. “It's a natural progression. It allows them to … be better coordinated, I guess you could say.”

Massie said the top three contraband items in Oklahoma prisons today are drugs, cigarettes and cellphones.

While steep prices for drugs and cigarettes are well-documented in prisons, Massie said a cellphone can fetch anywhere between $100 and $600 — and that's just what he's heard.

“They're quite valuable, for obvious reasons,” he said.

In Oklahoma County, a woman was arrested earlier in the year on complaints of smuggling two phones into the county jail. She told investigators she was offered $2,000 to deliver the phones — and chargers — to an unnamed inmate.

But cellphones can be used for more than just acquiring more contraband, Massie said.

“Inmates can use them to coordinate escape attempts,” he said. “That's something we're hearing and seeing more of over the past few years.”

Massie said that cellphones have become an issue “over the last five or six years,” as the devices have become cheaper and even more ubiquitous.

“As they gotten smaller and smaller, they're just much easier to conceal and that much easier to smuggle larger amounts of them in at once,” he said.

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by Andrew Knittle
Investigative Reporter
Andrew Knittle has covered state water issues, tribal concerns and major criminal proceedings during his career as an Oklahoma journalist. He has won reporting awards from the state's Associated Press bureau and prides himself on finding a real...
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