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Cherokee bike riders travel Trail of Tears

Cherokee teenagers and young adults will bicycle the whole length of the Trail of Tears.
by Ken Raymond Published: May 29, 2012
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— Imagine, if you can, the horror.

One winter day, federal forces order you to abandon your home and your community. Displaced and confused, you're herded into a stockade where you remain until the biting breath of deep winter is at its sharpest.

Then you and 16,000 others like you — your family, neighbors and friends — are expelled from the stockade and forced to march. You stagger across uneven terrain and through icy water; at night you huddle together for whatever warmth you can find.

Each day is a fight for survival — a fight those around you are losing at a staggering rate. Four thousand die before you reach your destination; those who remain have crossed an area equivalent in size to Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas.

Can you imagine it?

In 1838-1839, the Cherokee Nation lived that experience.

Their journey came to be known as the Trail of Tears, and even now, 173 years later, it remains among the worst episodes in American history.

The Cherokee don't want to forget what their ancestors suffered. That's the motivation behind the Remember the Removal Ride, a more than 900-mile bicycle trip that retraces one of the routes of the Trail of Tears.

“Remember the Removal is a commemorative bike ride that involves Cherokee students,” said LeeAnn Dreadfulwater, editorial liaison for the Cherokee Nation, in a recent phone interview.

“It is a leadership event than not only teaches their history but connects them with their ancestry. It also teaches them about the hardships people can and do survive and reach beyond to find their inner strength.”

The ride has continued off and on since 1984. This year will mark the fourth consecutive event.

Not everyone who wants to ride is chosen. Acceptance comes after a competitive application process. Candidates are asked to explain why they want to participate and what they hope to learn. Beyond that, they must be in excellent riding shape and be willing to train vigorously in the months leading up to the ride.

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by Ken Raymond
Book Editor
Ken Raymond is the book editor. He joined The Oklahoman in 1999. He has won dozens of state, regional and national writing awards. Three times he has been named the state's "overall best" writer by the Society of Professional Journalists. In...
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