Cities come to Oklahoma City learn from MAPS experience

Delegations from cities across the nation have visited Oklahoma City to determine whether they can translate its successful transformation to their hometowns.
BY STEVE LACKMEYER Business Writer slackmeyer@opubco.com Published: December 8, 2013
Advertisement
;

Maybe it was the arrival of the Hornets in 2005, or maybe it was the emergence of the Oklahoma River as a premier rowing venue that caught the interest of civic leaders across the country. But starting in 2006, multiple cities each year have sought to learn the inside story of Oklahoma City's renaissance.

The original Metropolitan Area Projects has become the talk of the country, and to date, more than 24 civic delegations have traveled to Oklahoma City to determine how this success story can be replicated in their hometowns.

The outside interest actually began much earlier. In 1997, then Mayor Ron Norick joined up with MAPS promoter Rick Horrow in traveling to Hampton Roads, Va., to explain the city's MAPS program — one that had yet to see anything built. But Hampton Roads civic leaders were so impressed with the effort that they launched their own ballot initiative, and they called it Metropolitan Area Project Strategies — MAPS.

The following list reflects visiting civic delegations hosted by the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber. Other cities that have sent visiting delegations include Birmingham, Ala. and Raleigh, N.C.

2006:

Lexington, Ky.

Springfield, Mo.

2007:

Lubbock, Texas.

Richmond, Va.

2008:

Jackson, Miss.

Waco, Texas.

Wichita, Kan.

2010:

Corpus Christi, Texas.

Topeka, Kan.

2011:

Albuquerque, N.M.

Colorado Springs, Colo.

Shreveport, La.

2012:

Boise, Idaho.

Columbus, Ga.

El Paso, Texas.

Louisville, Ky.

Mobile, Ala.

Salina, Kan.

2013:

Evansville, Ind.

Lafayette, La.

Little Rock, Ark.

Midland, Texas.

Tucson, Ariz.

Lawton

Contributing: Staff Writer Melissa Howell



Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Report: Caron Butler close to two-year deal with Detroit Pistons
  2. 2
    It’s harder to be a poor student in the U.S. than in Russia
  3. 3
    Man fatally stabbed in west Tulsa early Sunday
  4. 4
    How brain imaging can be used to predict the stock market
  5. 5
    Bridenstine tours Fort Sill, satisfied with facility's transparency
+ show more