Cleveland tops Dallas in bid to host RNC in 2016

Published on NewsOK Modified: July 8, 2014 at 2:09 pm •  Published: July 8, 2014
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Cleveland won the unanimous backing of a Republican National Committee panel on Tuesday, all but guaranteeing the GOP's 2016 presidential pick will accept the party's nomination in perennially hard-fought Ohio.

The Republicans' site selection committee backed Cleveland over donor-rich Dallas, and the full 168-member RNC is expected to ratify the choice next month. The move signals the role Ohio — and its 18 electoral votes— plays in presidential campaigns.

"As goes Ohio, so goes the presidential race," said party Chairman Reince Priebus.

The RNC did not announce a start date for the convention but Priebus said that June 28 or July 18, 2016, are the two options under consideration. An earlier-than-normal convention was a priority for Priebus, and leaders of Dallas' bid said the calendar was the main factor running against the Texas city.

"June is not an option for us," said former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, who was involved in Dallas' bid. "Reince really wants June."

Paying for the convention was another consideration. The previous two GOP conventions sapped party dollars during election years, and Priebus insisted the host city not leave the central party picking up the tab.

Although Dallas had the edge on fundraising as recently as last month, Cleveland narrowed that gap and lined up early pledges toward the expected $60 million price tag.

A successful convention is a boon not just to the political party, but also to the local economy.

In a post-convention report, organizers of Tampa, Florida's 2012 GOP convention said its $58 million in fundraising resulted in a $214 million direct economic impact. Some 50,000 activists, officials and reporters descended on the Tampa area for the convention, officials said.

"It provides us with an opportunity to showcase not only a great city, but a great state and a great message," Ohio GOP chairman Matt Borges said.

Gone are the days when its polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire. Cleveland, once dubbed "The Mistake by the Lake," has undergone dramatic redevelopment in recent years — $4.5 billion in projects have been completed in the past decade or are about to begin construction.

Its turnaround was a major part of Cleveland's aggressive — and persuasive — pitch to host the Republicans on the shores of Lake Erie.

"I've got to tell you: if you haven't been to Cleveland lately, it's a real surprise how beautiful it is down by that lake," Priebus said on Fox News.

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