Collected Wisdom: J.D. Runnels, former Oklahoma football player

J.D. Runnels has a 5-year-old son and reflects on his early days in football, his time at OU, his feeling on Hard Knocks and whether or not he would allow his son to play football.
by Ryan Aber Published: January 18, 2014
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photo - J.D. Runnels celebrates after the Oklahoma Sooners (OU) beat the Oregon Ducks in the Pacific Life Holiday Bowl college football game at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, Calif., Thursday, December 29, 2005. By Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman.
J.D. Runnels celebrates after the Oklahoma Sooners (OU) beat the Oregon Ducks in the Pacific Life Holiday Bowl college football game at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, Calif., Thursday, December 29, 2005. By Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman.

After winning three state championships in high school at Carl Albert, J.D. Runnels went on to become a coaches' (and fans') favorite as a pass-catching, physical fullback at Oklahoma. During his four years, the Sooners made a pair of national title appearances and won the Rose Bowl.

Runnels was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the sixth round in 2006 and went on to be a part of the Bears' run to the Super Bowl after the 2006 season. After being waived by the Bears, then subsequently released by Tampa Bay, Runnels joined Cincinnati. Before the 2009 season, his second with the Bengals, Runnels was cut in a clip that made HBO's Hard Knocks documentary that followed the Bengals through training camp.

After giving up football, Runnels started doing personal training in Norman and recently opened a gym of his own in Midwest City.

Runnels has a 5-year-old son and reflects on his early days in football, his time at OU, his feeling on Hard Knocks and whether or not he would allow his son to play football.

I started playing football really early. My mom was ready to get me out of the house so I started when I was 4 or 5. I played in Oklahoma City in some independent leagues with the T-Birds. We started out really, really early and just kept it going and it paid off.

When I made All-State my junior year I figured I was going to be one of the best players in the state and I figured that colleges were going to come calling and obviously I was doing something right. When The Oklahoman picked me for that it kind of sunk in that this was going to be my ticket.

My brother Lenny graduated high school at like 135 pounds so he wasn't the biggest football player. He's 10 years older than me so when he left to go to college, my mom was used to cooking for two or three kids and now she's just cooking for me so I was eating a bunch and didn't want him to come home and pick on me like he usually did so I gained a bunch of weight. It was good. That junior year when I made All-State I also got selected to play with Athletes First, the independent basketball team, which back then was a pretty big deal. Coach Terry Evans was our coach and wanted me to be their starting point guard which was a huge, huge deal I thought. But I had this deal where I was starting at Carl Albert both ways and I just didn't think I could do both. Lenny tried to talk me into basketball but it just didn't work. It was probably in ninth or 10th grade when I finally got bigger than him.

I've had a lot of coaches that molded me. My first coach, coach (Benjamin) Steele with the T-Birds was very influential. He started me out with the game. My brother, Lenny Hatchett, who's at Edmond Santa Fe was big for me. I was a big basketball player coming up and he helped out with a lot of my athleticism. Coach (Gary) Rose at Carl Albert was huge. Coach (Tex) Rollins at Carl Albert was huge. Coach (Michael) Parker who was my tight end coach who's at SNU now was huge. A lot of them just kind of were — they all molded me in different ways. My brother was tough love. A lot of those guys were very, very disciplined. Coach Rollins is a former Army guy. Coach Rose has won nine titles — you don't get that without being very disciplined. They each had their own little deal with me. Coach Rollins gave me my toughness. Coach Rose showed me how to put everything together and then obviously Bob Stoops really got the best out of me through my four years in Norman.

One of my coaches — Matt Weber who is now at Ada — he was my offensive coordinator in high school and he gave me some of the probably best advice I could've ever gotten and I hadn't ever thought about it. He said, ‘J.D., when you get to that level, the way you're going to open people's eyes is you go take the biggest dude and you just knock the snot out of him. You just go hit him as hard as you can.' I remember I got in on one of my first scrimmages at OU and I was working with the second string. It was just two or three weeks into practice I got a hit on Lance Mitchell. It really opened Bob's eyes. One of the ways that he motivates kids is he shows you a little bit of interest and then you have to go and constantly do what he likes. To impress him and do that over and over again can be difficult but just taking that mentality of knowing what he likes and knowing that he liked a tough player, I was just out there hitting people the whole time and he really, really liked it.

I love watching guys like Trey (Millard), (Aaron) Ripkowski, Brody Eldridge, Matt Clapp. It's great. It's fun to know that fullback is still a part of our offense. It makes a difference with us having a two-back system. A lot of successful running games have two-back systems. You look at what Bama's done over the years — they constantly have a fullback in there. LSU and teams like that and in the NFL as well. A lot of those teams, when you get down to the goal line have a good fullback. It's fun to see it evolving and it's really fun to see those guys getting the ball now especially since I didn't.


by Ryan Aber
Reporter
Ryan Aber has worked for The Oklahoman since 2006, covering high schools, the Oklahoma City RedHawks, the Oklahoma City Barons and OU football recruiting. An Oklahoma City native, Aber graduated from Northeastern State. Before joining The...
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