Collected Wisdom: Lonny Cobble, Oklahoma Christian baseball coach

Until last week, Lonny Cobble was the only baseball coach Edmond Santa Fe had ever known. Less than a month before the season ended, Cobble accepted the head coaching job at Oklahoma Christian University.
by Ryan Aber Published: June 23, 2012
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photo - Lonny Cobble
Lonny Cobble

Until last week, Lonny Cobble was the only baseball coach Edmond Santa Fe had ever known. The Tuttle native coached the Wolves for 19 seasons from the school's inception to this year, when Santa Fe made yet another appearance in the Class 6A state tournament. Less than a month before the season ended, Cobble accepted the head coaching job at Oklahoma Christian University. In addition to coaching, Cobble has been a high school football official.

I knew I wanted to be a coach from the time I was in high school, just after my dad coached me. Seeing the fun that he had and, of course, being around my high school coach Pete Sangirardi and watching the way they did things made me believe that that's what I wanted to do with my life. Those guys made it fun.

They not only love the game but they really love their players and they care about their players not only on the field but away from it as well. (Sangirardi) always took an interest in us. He hurt with us with every loss. I can remember just knowing that I would do whatever I could to make that guy happy. I was the same way with my dad. I wanted to win and make those guys happy and in return, they felt for us. They wanted us to win, they wanted us to do our best and they genuinely cared about us as baseball players and people. I think that's something that baseball coaches need to do better sometimes. We need to let players know you care about them. Let them see that emotion that sometimes we don't show enough.

My father, James, was my coach in junior high and he was my principal. He's retired now and comes out to watch my son play. He was always very fair. I played football and I wasn't a quarterback. I know a lot of times dads growing up wouldn't pushed their son into that role. They want their son to be the quarterback, the shortstop, the five-hole hitter. He genuinely was fair and I think that's hard for dads sometimes. It helped me a lot when my son played for me.

Coach Sangirardi was a guy that gave people second chances. I want to see the good in people. I want to make sure kids have every opportunity to succeed. I want to believe they're going to do the right thing. Sometimes maybe that makes me a little too soft but that's how I am.

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by Ryan Aber
Reporter
Ryan Aber has worked for The Oklahoman since 2006, covering high schools, the Oklahoma City RedHawks, the Oklahoma City Barons and OU football recruiting. An Oklahoma City native, Aber graduated from Northeastern State. Before joining The...
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