Collected Wisdom: William Tisdale, former OU/Tulsa Washington player and brother of Wayman Tisdale

William Tisdale was in Oklahoma City Saturday night to coach the Tulsa Washington alumni basketball team. And you couldn't wipe that smile off his face during an evening that conjured incredible memories, some more than three decades old.
INTERVIEWED BY SCOTT WRIGHT Published: August 10, 2013
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Wayman Tisdale might have been most recognized by his passionate smile.

Well, big brother William has that same wide grin, too.

William Tisdale was in Oklahoma City Saturday night to coach the Tulsa Washington alumni basketball team in a game against Douglass alumni.

And you couldn't wipe that smile off his face during an evening that conjured incredible memories, some more than three decades old.

William Tisdale is a pastor at Vision Outreach Center, and also works with high schoolchildren to prepare them for life after high school. He and his wife have three children.

It's a lot of fun to see the camaraderie that was built over the years, then to come back and see the competition come out again in these guys. This gave us a chance to bring people together, show the younger people how we used to compete, and how we would fellowship afterward.

We made some of our greatest memories when Booker T. would come over and play Douglass. We would bring 11 or 12 buses over. For football, we'd bring 40 or 50 buses full of people. The competition level that was there then was incredible. Even when we would play Northwest Classen, Star Spencer, John Marshall, it was real competition and camaraderie.

Leroy Combs and Kenneth Orange on that great team they had at Spencer — when we came up a few years later at Booker T., we would think, man if we took our team and competed against that team, or that great 1984 Douglass team, how fun would that be?

It's kind of sad to see that some of those rivalries have gone past. The talent level was always there, and even more important, a lot of us played summer league ball together. Now you have thousands of AAU teams around. Everybody has an AAU team.

Back then, we had the Rams and the Tulsa Hurricanes, but when we got ready to play a big tournament, a lot of us would come together. So you'd have Mark Price, Wayman Tisdale and all the great players in the state coming together. And you came together for a common cause, to go out and be champions.

Wayman was always the one that played in the sandbox. He was a sandbox kid. Me and Weldon, our older brother, would be out there working hard to get better, but Wayman was always just nonchalant.

They always say the youngest gets the most talent (laughs). Up until the sixth grade, he and I were the same height, then he just began to grow.

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