Share “College Football Playoff: Why the playoff...”

College Football Playoff: Why the playoff makes nonconference games more important

Nonconference showdowns aren’t just elimination games and resume boosters for teams. Now, nonconference showdowns are yardmakers for conferences. They are the chief metric by which leagues can be compared. And comparing leagues is far more important than ever before.
by Berry Tramel Published: August 28, 2014


photo - Boise State quarterback Grant Hendrick gets off a pass under pressure from Mississippi defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Curtis Compton)
Boise State quarterback Grant Hendrick gets off a pass under pressure from Mississippi defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Curtis Compton)

College football has arrived, and with a decent bang. Lots of good nonconference games. Clemson-Georgia, Wisconsin-LSU, OSU-Florida State, all Saturday. Ole Miss-Boise State got a head start Thursday night.

And those games come with more panache than in the past, thanks to the new college football playoff system.

In days gone by, Clemson-Georgia was huge for Clemson and Georgia. Wisconsin and LSU gargantuan for the Badgers and Bayou Bengals. OSU and Florida State bigger than big for the Pistol Petes and Osceolas.

But that has changed. Nonconference showdowns aren’t just elimination games and resume boosters for teams. Now, nonconference showdowns are yardmakers for conferences. They are the chief metric by which leagues can be compared. And comparing leagues is far more important than ever before.

That’s because the electorate has changed.

College football for decades relied on writers and coaches to pick a national champion. Then it relied on writers and coaches and dignitaries and computer formulas to pick two teams to play in a title game. Now, to bracket four teams for a tournament, the sport has called upon 13 people, all theoretically sharper than Charlemagne’s sword.

Maybe they are, maybe they’re not. If not, we’ll know soon enough. The committee will rank teams the way pollsters have ranked teams for 70 years. By the loss column.

Like the coaches vote in 1990, when they voted Georgia Tech the national champ with an 11-0-1 record. Those Yellowjackets’ best wins came in the Citrus Bowl over Nebraska, ranked 19th by AP, and Clemson, which was ranked 15th at the time and finished 13th. Georgia Tech tied mediocre North Carolina.

Meanwhile, Colorado finished 11-1-1. The Buffaloes tied a Tennessee team that went to the Sugar Bowl, lost to an Illinois team that tied for the Big Ten title and beat Pac-12 champ Washington, Southwest Conference champ Texas, Nebraska, OU (which finished 8-3) and Notre Dame, the latter in the Orange Bowl. It was one of the greatest seasons in gridiron history.

And the coaches voted Georgia Tech No. 1. If the new committee votes like those gooberheaded coaches of 1990, we’ve been walking around in circles and still haven’t found our way out of the wilderness.

But maybe the committee will do what it’s been commissioned to do and what the members say they will do. Not be lemmings. Not just check the records and then order room service. If the committee will study teams and schedules and results, college football actually could rise above the morass and find the four most worthy squads to battle for the championship of American campus football.

Which brings us back to nonconference showdowns. If you don’t automatically pick 12-0 Baylor over 12-1 South Carolina, or don’t automatically pick 13-0 Florida State over 12-1 Oregon, or don’t automatically pick 12-1 Ohio State over 11-2 Alabama, how do you differentiate?

Continue reading this story on the...

by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The Oklahoman,...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Baylor promotes Kendal Briles to offensive coordinator
  2. 2
    Risks in Using Social Media to Spot Signs of Mental Distress
  3. 3
    Abusers using spyware apps to monitor partners reaches 'epidemic proportions'
  4. 4
    OU football: Defensive tackle Matt Romar injured at practice
  5. 5
    Police: Cartel claims they have kidnapped Border Patrol agent
+ show more