Column: A-Rod's PED use 'most potent we've seen.'

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 14, 2014 at 5:54 pm •  Published: January 14, 2014
Advertisement
;

If Anthony Bosch were still in business today, bet on this much: His phone would be buzzing nonstop with athletes trying to order the A-rod treatment.

The self-taught doping guru whose testimony and records brought down Alex Rodriguez sounded at times like a snake-oil salesman while detailing the down-to-the-minute regimen of performance-enhancing substances he delivered to the disgraced baseball star.

Included were concoctions called "gummies" and "liquid soap," ''pink cream," ''blue cream" and even "PM cream" — each with varying doses of testosterone delivered in different ways throughout the day.

Silly as those sound, don't laugh. Elite athletes would gargle with antifreeze if they believed that would improve performance without tripping a positive test.

And unlike the deer-antler spray and the other crackpot cures (holographic stickers, negatively charged water, underwear exposed to radio waves) that Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis tried to explain away at last year's Super Bowl, nearly all of what Bosch was providing A-Rod for $12,000 a month actually worked.

Peel away the pseudo-science and Bosch's bragging and what remained was "probably the most potent and sophisticated drug program developed for an athlete that we've ever seen," U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO Travis Tygart said.

"No one who cares about clean sports likes to hear it," Tygart said in an interview with The Associated Press. "And don't just take my word for it. Look at the findings of an independent arbitrator who saw all the evidence, sat through the testimony and laid the whole conspiracy out.

Tygart said Bosch's regimen included dozens of blood tests to see how the drugs were metabolizing and which doses to use when. It included peptides and female fertility drugs to supplement testosterone, human growth hormone and an insulin-like growth factor.

"At the end of the day," Tygart added, "this was a potent cocktail of sophisticated PEDs stacked together to deliver power, aid recovery, avoid detection and create a home run champion."

Added Dr. Gary Wadler, past chairman of the World Anti-Doping Agency's banned substance committee, "It was illegal from start to finish and not all of it was scientific, but let's be honest — this guy Bosch knew an awful lot of what he was talking about."

Tygart takes some consolation in knowing that improvements to MLB's drug-testing program make it unlikely a player could avoid detection employing the same regimen today. What troubles him, though, is that much of the discussion in the wake of Bosch's "60 Minutes" interview has focused on the those substances with catchy nicknames like "gummies" and "pink food," but actually did little to improve performance.

Continue reading this story on the...