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Column: 'He already won _ just by being here'

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 13, 2013 at 2:09 am •  Published: June 13, 2013
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ARDMORE, Pa. (AP) — It isn't until you run across a story like Jesse Smith's that you remember why this is called the U.S. Open.

There's no shortage of long shots, wannabes and never-weres in the field. But scan a bio of any of the 155 other entrants who tee off Thursday and you won't find even one like his.

Smith is 33 and has yet to hit a shot on the PGA Tour. Golf wasn't even on his radar until he was well into his teens. He didn't have much of an amateur career, either, unless you count talking his way onto the Colgate golf team. While trying to carve out a living on the mini-tours from Canada to the deep South afterward, he spent part of each year living in his grandfather's log cabin on the Six Nations Territory near Brantford, Ontario. It was hardly a hotbed for the game.

"One day up there, it was 95 degrees, really hot for that place, so I knocked off after four or five hours of playing and came inside," Smith recalled. "My grandfather came straight over and looked me in the eye. All he said was, 'Jesse, if you want to be better, you have to practice more.'

"I turned around and went back out. He died six years ago, but I can still hear those words," he said.

Yet anyone who expected Smith to reach the big-time would have bet it would be hockey or baseball. He learned those games from his father, Guy, a full-blooded Mohawk who played at the University of New Hampshire and in the old World Hockey Association before becoming a high school coach.

One day, Guy Smith dropped his son off at the UNH rink, went to park the car and suffered a fatal heart attack at age 44. In the aftermath, the golf courses Jesse played sparingly growing up became the quiet places he turned to cope with his father's death.

"From morning till the sun went down, he'd hit me ground balls," Smith said Wednesday, on a final tour of Merion Golf Club in preparation for his opening round. "When he coached us, he'd hit more to me than the other kids, probably harder grounders, too. But he never short-changed me on the teaching end, either. ...

"He touched a lot of people," Smith said. "When I qualified to play here, I got more than a few text messages from friends reminding me of that."

Outside the gallery ropes, Lynn Smith was near tears — and this was just the practice round.

"I always knew it would happen," she said. "He struggled with golf, and as a mother I had a hard time with it. He'd say, 'Trust me,' but honestly, it was hard.

"He struggled so much. But his father was the same way. He played pro hockey, then went back to school to become an equine veterinarian. He wanted Jesse to follow his own path.

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