Committee won't dictate number of conference games

Published on NewsOK Modified: April 29, 2014 at 7:19 pm •  Published: April 29, 2014
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IRVING, Texas (AP) — The College Football Playoff selection committee does not want to dictate how many conference games leagues play.

Playoff executive director Bill Hancock and the FBS conference commissioners are meeting this week at the Four Seasons Hotel outside of Dallas to work out remaining details of the four-team playoff that will replace the Bowl Championship Series this season.

The first championship game in the new postseason format will be played at AT&T Stadium in Arlington.

The Southeastern Conference recently announced it will stay with an eight-game league schedule instead of going to nine games. The Pac-12 and Big 12 currently play nine games and the Big Ten is moving to a nine-game conference slate. The Atlantic Coast Conference plays eight league games, plus five of its teams will play Notre Dame each season.

"The (selection) committee will not be in the business of dictating to conferences their scheduling," Hancock said.

Hancock said the "totality" of a team's schedule will be evaluated by the selection committee for its difficulty.

"Every game that everybody plays will be taking into consideration," Hancock said. "To the committee it won't matter whether you played an eight- or nine-game conference schedule. But it will matter who you played for your 12 or 13 games. And, of course, how you did against them."

Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby said he has been talking to athletic directors and coaches in his conference about how best to schedule if the school has playoff aspirations — and knows similar conversations are going on in the other leagues.

"We don't have to play a murderer's row (out of conference)," Bowlsby said. "You don't have to play three top-20 teams. But you also, if you want to be able to have the tiebreaker between being fifth and being fourth in the playoff selection, you want to have played a representative nonconference schedule."