Concert review: A voyage on the Starship 'Philharmonic'

The Oklahoma City Philharmonic, in a “Sci-Fi Spectacular” evening, brought actor George Takei, soprano Kristen Plumley, and guest conductor Jack Everly to the Civic Center stage
BY ANNA HOLLOWAY Modified: November 5, 2013 at 3:22 pm •  Published: November 4, 2013


photo - Surrounded by members of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, conductor Jack Everly heralds George Takei, narrator of the "Sci-Fi Spectacular" show that the philharmonic performed last weekend. PHOTO PROVIDED BY WENDY MUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY. <strong>WENDYMUTZ - WENDY MUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY</strong>
Surrounded by members of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, conductor Jack Everly heralds George Takei, narrator of the "Sci-Fi Spectacular" show that the philharmonic performed last weekend. PHOTO PROVIDED BY WENDY MUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY. WENDYMUTZ - WENDY MUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY

The Oklahoma City Philharmonic, in a “Sci-Fi Spectacular” evening, brought actor George Takei, soprano Kristen Plumley, and guest conductor Jack Everly to the Civic Center Music Hall stage to highlight the music of John Williams and other composers who have illustrated great moments in science fiction.

With his rich and beautiful voice, Takei spoke of Gene Roddenberry's initial vision for the crew of a starship: a large group of diverse people with a variety of backgrounds, histories and cultures who work together as a team. He might have been describing the OKC Philharmonic.

Takei told a series of anecdotes from the early history of “Star Trek” and later performed the famous speech of Klaatu, the visiting alien from the 1951 film “The Day the Earth Stood Still.” Originally from a 1940 short story, this prescient text calls humanity to consider the cost of aggression.

Plumley sang Alexander Courage's theme from the original “Star Trek” series as part of a medley of the themes from all five shows. Later in the evening she provided the vocal instrumentation in the suite from Bernard Herrmann's compelling score for “The Day the Earth Stood Still.”

Everly conducted not only the orchestra but the whole event; his informative commentary was lighthearted and enlightening. His arrangement of themes from science-fiction television was a great hit in the first part of the event; later, audience members were challenged to name the shows included.

The Philharmonic's brass and string sections engaged in an exciting dialogue for most of the evening. By far the composer most frequently played was John Williams; his use of the strings and brass to speak to each other and to create dramatic textures is a marker for his music. His scores for the “Star Wars” films were well represented by four selections.

Suites from his scores for “Superman” and “E.T.” were also included. The piccolo solo in “The Adventures of E.T.” stood out as a delicate and poignant moment, backlit by an evocative full moon behind the orchestra and chorale. This was great music, theatrically and warmly presented, played with spirit and skill.

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