Share “Concrete blocks provide resistance to high...”

Concrete blocks provide resistance to high winds

Brian Lenz, who worked with hurricane-resistant construction materials in Florida before moving to Oklahoma, said he was surprised to find concrete blocks were not more common here in Tornado Alley.
By Tim Fall, For The Oklahoman Modified: March 20, 2014 at 1:05 pm •  Published: March 22, 2014

In Moore, near the intersection of Santa Fe Avenue and SW 19, the landscape is still largely barren along the path traced by last May’s deadly tornado.

Concrete slabs remain where the houses they supported were either blown away or bulldozed afterward. Stripped and broken trees resemble skeleton hands reaching up from the mud and gravel.

But there is human activity, lots of it — mostly contractor trucks and construction crews. The effort to rebuild that began on May 21 last year continues, and to the untrained eye it appears that years’ worth of vacant lots remain to be rebuilt.

In addition to the confidence it takes to build in or near the destructive track of at least two powerful tornadoes, a local builder is meeting the challenge with “resilient” construction technology designed to withstand killer winds.

Josh Kitchen, a partner in McAlister Construction, said that the house his firm is building as a model at 14517 Brent Drive is unusual for the region in that it is being built with 8-inch Dolese concrete block walls around the entire exterior, replacing traditional wood framing.

“It’s as tornado proof as anything being built today,” Kitchen said.

The Brent Drive house features not only wind resistance, but also greater insulation ratings and increased water impermeability from the stacked concrete blocks.

The block walls’ strength comes from internal steel support bars and a vertical concrete pour through the hollow blocks at door and window openings, and at 4-foot intervals around the house’s perimeter.

Brian Lenz, who markets masonry products for Dolese Bros., said the methods employed in the house’s exterior wall construction will ensure that the house is resistant to winds up to 135 miles per hour.

Lenz, who worked with hurricane-resistant construction materials in Florida before moving to Oklahoma, said he was surprised to find concrete blocks were not more common here in Tornado Alley.

“Ninety-five percent of houses in Florida are built like this,” said Lenz, who will be at the house Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to show the site and answer questions. The area is northwest of S Santa Fe Avenue and SW 149 (SW 19 in Moore).

Continue reading this story on the...


To see a related video, scan the QR code below or go to NewsOK.com

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Parents enter pleas after 2-year-old starved 'literally, almost to death'
  2. 2
    Tulsa County officials told to delete documents, text indicates
  3. 3
    Michele Bachmann May Be Islamic State Target
  4. 4
    Chinese Hackers May Have Attacked Apple's iCloud
  5. 5
    White House Chief Of Staff Negotiating Redaction Of CIA Torture Report
+ show more