Confidence and attitude keys to success

BY SAMANTHA NOLEN Modified: October 26, 2012 at 1:12 pm •  Published: October 26, 2012
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Dear Sam: I am so confused and I am hoping you can clear some things up for me. I took an incredible amount of time writing my résumé and it has been met with mixed reviews on everything from the format to the length to the content.

How can I know what I am doing is right if everyone has different critiques of the same thing? My main questions pertain to (1) how long my résumé should be, (2) what format it should be in, and (3) how much experience I should include. Thanks for clearing things up for me! – Lenny

Dear Lenny: Unfortunately, when it comes to résumé writing everyone has an opinion and every other person thinks he/she is an expert. Résumé critiques have to be taken with a grain of salt, as you sometimes do not know the background of the reviewer and whether he/she is providing guidance based on personal preferences and not best practices-based techniques.

If you feel your résumé positions you as you want to be seen, speaks the language of your target audience, and is aesthetically pleasing, then stop critiquing and start using! As far as your specific questions go, let me shed some light from an expert’s perspective.

(1) Your résumé should be two pages based on your presentation of 17 years of experience. The “one page rule” is not a rule anymore — it hasn’t been for 10+ years — so take some space to present the value in your experience.

(2) You have chosen a solid reverse chronological format, which is appropriate for your background, given you do not have potential disqualifiers you are attempting to mask. Your design also is aesthetically pleasing, balanced, and consistent.

(3) It is standard to present about 10-15 years of professional experience when developing a résumé unless you are at a more senior level of management. In your case, based on the tenure of your roles, I think you could present what you have or cut experience a little earlier and present just your last three assignments totaling 13 years. This will ensure you paint the most competitive picture and not one that suggests you are overqualified.

Dear Sam: I was thinking of placing a QR code on my résumé and wondered if this was something you were seeing more of in today’s searches. I am not in the technology field (I am actually a customer service agent) but I am trying to do anything to get some extra attention in my search. – John

Dear John: You are an early adopter if you are thinking of placing a QR code on your résumé and, while I am not saying it is not sometimes value-added, I am saying that it has to be done for a reason and not just to look tech savvy.

QR codes — also called Quick Response Codes, for readers who are not as familiar — are matrix barcodes that consist of small square dots arranged in a pattern on a white background. Think of it as a modern barcode you can scan with your smartphone to view advertisements, be sent to specific websites, or link to other promotional information or collateral. Retailers use QR codes to allow consumers on-demand access to promotional information or even loyalty programs.



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